Tag: Berrydale Park

SE 89th and Taylor LID’s Burden and Benefit

On October 12th, Portland City Council approved a declaration of intent to form the SE 89th Ave and Taylor St Local Improvement District (LID). This proposed infrastructure project would rebuild 450 feet of SE 89th Avenue adjacent to Berrydale Park, adding curbs and sidewalks to this partially paved roadway. The LID would also add sidewalks on the south side of SE Taylor Street from 92nd Avenue to 98th Avenue. Although unanimously approved, the Council members expressed deep concerns regarding the financial burden placed on the adjacent homeowners, some of whom testified against this LID’s formation.

Local Improvement Districts form when a majority of property owners in an area elect to pool private funds with the City of Portland, sharing the cost of infrastructure construction. Landowners commonly use LIDs to improve unpaved streets and reconstruct paved roads not built to current engineering standards. Although SE 89th Avenue has paved travel lanes, it’s bordered by curbless gravel shoulders, lacks stormwater management, and has no sidewalks. Andrew Aebi, Portland’s Local Improvement District Administrator, worked with Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty to propose this LID formation ahead of Berrydale Park’s renovation in the Spring of 2024. Portland Parks & Recreation owns the majority of street frontages included in this LID and will shoulder the bulk of its costs.

Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) chose to pursue this expanded infrastructure improvement project based on lessons learned from the missed opportunities of past projects. In 2007, Portland Parks & Recreation (PP&R) built Holly Farm Park in a neighborhood of SW Portland without sidewalks, consistent curbs, or stormwater management. Crews constructed the missing infrastructure around the Park’s frontage and reconstructed the road to the center of the street. However, the properties across from the Park still lack sidewalks and stormwater management. Aebi pointed to this project as a turning point in the City. The lost opportunity to improve conditions for adjacent residents was glaring. PP&R now collaborates with the other Portland bureaus to include infrastructure upgrades during Park construction and encourages LID formations so area residents can take advantage of discounted upgrades made cheaper by piggybacking on funded projects.

At last Wednesday’s City Council meeting, Aebi explained that regardless of a LID’s formation, the Berrydale Park project will include curb and sidewalk construction on PP&R property. However, as is now standard procedure, City staff proposed the SE 89th Ave and Taylor St Local Improvement District to offer cost savings to adjacent property owners. If this LID is approved by City Council on November 30th, residences involved in the LID could pay substantially less for the infrastructure improvements. “We have structured this LID so that Parks pays the lion’s share of LID Costs,” said Aebi. The savings stem from an 800,000 commitment to the LID from PP&R and other City contributions intended to defer the financial burden placed on homeowners. The City will cover all roadway reconstruction costs and only ask residents to pay for the curbs and sidewalks built in front of their property.

Even with all the expected cost savings for property owners, the City is seeking a significant sum. If City Council enacts the LID as presented, 14 property owners will each contribute close to $24,000. Payment is due after LID work is completed, with the option to pay over time. Financed over 20 years, people would pay $165 per month for the infrastructure added to their property. Although not an exorbitant amount, people on fixed incomes could face hardship due to the forced monthly payment. Commissioner Dan Ryan expressed reluctance to approve the LID, fearing that this financial imposition could jeopardize retired people’s ability to age in place.

Looking west on SE Taylor showing where the sidewalk ends at SE 89th

In addition to the homeowners opposed to the LID, City Council heard from three testifiers in favor of the project. However, those in support of the LID were not members of the planned improvement district. Instead, they all lived near Berrydale Park and planned to use the sidewalk infrastructure to navigate the neighborhood. One speaker, who uses a wheelchair, mentioned the challenges of moving around his street due to the lack of curb ramps and sidewalks. His testimony highlighted the shared responsibility for infrastructure in a community and how delaying these updates will negatively impact other people on the street.

City staff will keep working with affected property owners and try to find options that everyone can accept. Andrew Aebi anticipates returning to Council in November with two different proposals for a LID in this area. He intends to present an option that will fully modernize the public infrastructure around the Park’s property and another that creates fewer enhancements but still builds the pedestrian access needed for parkgoers and schoolchildren walking to this destination. City Council will hear this item next month and likely vote on the LID formation in December. 

Corner Reconstruction Near Park on SE 92nd

The Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) intends to update the sidewalk corners along SE 92nd Avenue at Taylor and Yamhill Streets. These intersections provide multimodal access for pedestrians traveling to Berrydale Park and the adjacent public school. Work will add ramps to crossing points that currently lack them and replace outdated single-ramp corners.

Circles indicate curb ramp construction. Image from Portland Maps with illustrations by Montavilla News

Corners at these two intersections will use a dual ramp configuration that allows pedestrians to travel in a straight path across the roadway. Older single-ramp designs direct uses towards the intersection’s center point and require wheel-assisted pedestrians to change direction twice while crossing a street. Crews will also add a mid-block ramp to compensate for the shifted alignment of SE Taylor Street. New ramps will use the raised truncated dome pads at the street’s edge. Those yellow strips provide detectable warnings to people with vision impairments. The distinctive surface pattern of bumps are detectable by cane or underfoot, alerting people to street crossings and hazardous drop-offs.

Unlike other recent corner reconstructions in the area, this project will not incorporate curb extensions. Those sidewalk enhancements reduce pedestrian crossing distances and place the sidewalk zone at the outer edge of the parking lane. Road crews previously constructed curb extensions at SE 92nd Avenue and Market Street. However, that work was part of the East Portland Access to Employment and Education project that prioritized bike and pedestrian safety.

These sidewalk corner enhancements will assist school children and park users in traveling to their destinations. In 2024, Berrydale Park should see an increase in usage after a $3.75 million renovation planned for the currently sleepy city green space. Work may occur this year. However, as winter approaches, this project could push back to 2023. Pedestrians using these sidewalks should anticipate some detours when work begins.

Mid-block ramp in alignment with SE Taylor Street

Berrydale Park’s Skatepark Design Reveal June 29

The third and final Berrydale Park Open House Survey is available online through July 13th.


Article first published June 24th, 2022.

On Wednesday, June 29th, Portland Parks & Recreation (PP&R) staff will present the final design for the new Berrydale skatepark at an open house. Residents are invited to attend from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. in the southeast corner of Berrydale Park, at 9004 SE Taylor Street. At the event, PP&R will continue soliciting community feedback on new playground design options included in the Berrydale Park Improvement Project.

Image courtesy Portland of Parks & Recreation. Image does not represent the final design

Next week’s gathering is the third and final open house for the $3.75 million renovation project. The proposed budget doubled over the last year, with Parks Commissioner Carmen Rubio increasing allocated funds to $3.0 million from an original $1.5 million budget. The bureau will source that money from System Development Charges (SDC) and not the City’s general budget. PP&R’s planned upgrades will significantly enhance the recreational amenities at the 66-year-old City park. The proposed upgrades will create a new skatepark facility, new pathways, new lighting, street improvements, and a new playground.

This open house is the last time the public can significantly influence the future appearance of the Berrydale Park Improvement Project. After a full year of community engagement, the project is now at the end of the design phase. Beginning in Fall 2022, City engineers will develop the construction documentation needed to secure permits and hire contractors. Construction crews will break ground on the project in the Spring of 2024, with the new park amenities opening in 2025.

Berrydale Park Open House April 13th

Update: Images from the presentation are available below and the survey link is now online.


Original article published April 8th, 2022.

Next Wednesday, Portland Parks & Recreations (PP&R) will host the second open house for the Berrydale Park Improvement Project. The $3.75 million projects will significantly enhance park amenities and ensure the space remains relevant to Portlanders of all ages. The proposed upgrades will create a new skatepark facility, new pathways, new lighting, street improvements, and a new playground.

The project’s budget doubled over the last year, with Parks Commissioner Carmen Rubio increasing allocated funds to $3.0 million from an original $1.5 million budget. The bureau will source that money from System Development Charges (SDC) and not the City’s general budget. Frontage improvement work is paid for through the PP&R Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Transition program. It will allocate $650K to address ADA access for the park. PP&R’s maintenance fund will cover new playground equipment costing $100k.

The additional funding ensures the construction of a new skateboarding area, plus items identified by the community as priorities during the July 2021 public engagement session. Now PP&R staff want to present design options for the new park amenities. The public can participate in two ways. Designers are hosting an in-person event at Berrydale Park near SE 92nd Avenue and Salmon Street on April 13 from 4 PM until 6 PM. People unable to join the open house can view visuals from the live event and complete a brief survey online. The survey will remain open through Sunday, April 24.

Residents who participate in next week’s community engagement will help PP&R shape the future of Berrydale Park. The updates planned will draw in new park users and wake up the somewhat sleepy public space on SE 92nd Avenue. The outdoor event on the 13th will occur regardless of the weather, and forecasts call for rain. Plan to dress accordingly or watch the Berrydale Park Improvement Project website for the online presentation and survey.

Image from Google Maps

Skatepark Meeting and Survey

Last Thursday, Portland Parks & Recreation (PP&R) held the first public engagement session for the Berrydale Park Skatepark Project. Staff invited community members to share their desires for the Park and participate in an online survey. The survey questions focus on the skatepark attributes and style. Other questions gather demographic information and gauge interest in general Park improvements that could become part of this project.

The event featured poster boards displaying four panels that included a multitude of skatepark design options. The same images appear in the survey to guide specific questions. The chosen images do not represent any particular plans for this Park but instead, provide general examples of various skatepark designs. The survey will remain open until Thursday, July 30.

Last week’s meeting was the first of three events that will take place ahead of construction. The following public engagement sessions will take place in Fall 2021 and Winter 2022. Crews will begin work in Spring of 2023, with a targeted completion date of Fall 2024. Much of the design work is months away. However, PP&R planers have determined the placement of the skatepark and committed to frontage improvements around the Park.

As part of this project, the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) will require sidewalks, curbs, and curb ramps around Berrydale Park’s parameters. Currently, SE Talyor Street and SE 89th Ave do not have sidewalks. Improvements may also come to the existing sidewalk on SE 92nd Ave. The park improvement presentation in the Fall will include some design details around this frontage work.

Image from Google Maps

PP&R coordinated with the neighboring Creative Science School to place the skatepark within the Park’s southeast corner. School administrators requested that its position allow school staff to see into the area from the school parking lot. Additionally, PP&R planners wanted to avoid any tree removal or demolition of existing park amenities. A small clearing near the school meets both conditions and provides a clear choice for placement.

Participate in the online survey within the next few days and look for a notice regarding the next phase of planning in the Fall. Outside of the survey, direct questions and comments about this project to Ken Rumbaugh, PP&R Community Engagement Coordinator, at 971-269-9042 or ken.rumbaugh@portlandoregon.gov

Berrydale Skatepark Design Outreach

Today, July 15th, Portland Parks & Recreation (PP&R) will hold its first community outreach event ahead of building a new Skatepark at Berrydale Park. The in-person meeting will begin at 5:30 PM and run until 7:30 PM. Presenters will share vision boards and discuss the Berrydale Park Skatepark Project with attendees. To attend, gather at the corner of SE 92nd Ave and Salmon Street at 5:30 PM. 

The second community meeting will occur sometime in the Fall of 2021. More information is available on the project’s website.


Original Story published May 12th, 2021

Portland Parks & Recreation (PP&R) recently created a Berrydale Park Skatepark Project page, featuring information about the proposed new amenities and a tentative schedule for community involvement with the planning process. The first community engagement meeting will occur this summer and is the best opportunity for residents to shape this development.

Funding for the new skatepark will come from System Development Charges (SDC) and not the City’s general budget, currently in negation. These enhancements are made possible thanks in part to voters approving Measure 26-213 last year. With additional funding, the park may gain improved pathways, updated playground equipment, and new site furnishings. Those furnishings could include lighting, drinking fountains, benches, trash cans, and signage.

When announced last month, there was substantial community interest in this project. PP&R quickly mobilized a Community Engagement Coordinator to lead this part of the development and start the outreach process. Below is the rough schedule for project milestones, of which the first four involve public communication. For the firm date of this summer’s listening session, keep an eye on the Berrydale Park Skatepark Project page and make time to express your vision for the park’s future.


  • Community Meeting 1 (Summer 2021) – Primarily a listening session. What’s important to the community?
  • Community Meeting 2 (Fall 2021) – Present skate park and park improvement design options based on what we heard in the first meeting.
  • Community Meeting 3 – (Winter 2022) – Refinements to designs we heard during meeting #2. We aim to cultivate community support. 
  • Community Meeting 4 (TBD) – (If necessary)
  • Conceptual Design and Analysis – August 2021 to January 2022
  • Construction Documentation – February 2022 to June 2022
  • Permitting and Bidding – July 2022 to July 2023
  • Construction – July 2023 to April 2024
  • Grand Opening – Summer 2024

Skateboarding at Berrydale Park

UPDATE – Portland Parks & Recreation created a Berrydale Park Skatepark Project page, featuring information about the proposed new amenities and a tentative schedule for community involvement with the planning process.

Yesterday Portland Parks & Recreation announced substantial investments in several neighborhood parks throughout the city. As part of that proposal, Montavilla’s Berrydale Park will gain a new skateboarding area with potentially more enhancements planned around the project. The new skatepark will join eight others in the Portland Parks system.

Last week, Early Assistance application 21-038776 outlined the potential upgrades coming to Berrydale Park beyond the approved skatepark. Mark Ross with Portland Parks & Recreation explained that the skateboarding area is the primary addition to the park, but other improvements could soon follow. “In the future, contingent on available funding, additional park amenities may include improved access, new site furnishings such as lighting, drinking fountains, benches, trash cans, and signage.”

With a total project budget of two million dollars ($2M), this work represents the most significant investment at this park within recent memory. Commissioner Carmen Rubio allocated one and a half million dollars ($1.5M) in System Development Charges (SDC) to this project, adding to the existing five-hundred-thousand dollars ($500K) in SDC funding. The added funds now allow for project planning to begin and ensures the completion of the skateboarding area.

Improvement to Portland parks is in line with city-wide efforts to curb a trend of violence and crime growing within the city. At a recent neighborhood meeting, Commissioner Mingus Mapps explained how after-school activities and the return of community programs outweigh increased policing in his plans to reduce crime. “If you are out doing something constructive, then you are not out doing something destructive.” Commissioner Mapps’ plan does not directly rely on park resources. However, these long-term investments by Parks & Recreation will create constructive outlets for the community, reinforcing other programs aimed at changing behavior.

The Berrydale Park project is scheduled to complete construction sometime in spring 2024. Within the coming months and years, Parks & Recreation staff will create proposed designs and engage with the community around this project. Look for opportunities to get involved when that phase of planning begins.

Skatepark at Glenhaven Park