Category: Property Lease

Glisan Warehouse for Lease

The 10,000 square-foot warehouse located at 7056 NE Glisan Street is for lease. The space is vacant and available for immediate occupancy. The property houses two other businesses, True North Studios at 455 NE 71st Ave and another business at 7034 NE Glisan Street.

City Houses Inc. manages this property of four separate addresses. Both 7044 and 7056 NE Glisan are offered together at the cost of one dollar per square foot. However, the owner would divide it into two spaces again if desired by a new tenant. Interested businesses should contact 503-235-1781 for more information or to schedule a tour.


UPDATE – Removed reference to the Marijuana-related business closing.

Veterinary Clinic on Stark

Today, a presentation at Portland City Council revealed a potential new tenant at 8037 SE Stark Street. The presenter explained that a group of veterinarians intended to create an urgent-care veterinary clinic in the corner shopfront. However, required site improvements could diminish or cancel their plans. This project served as one example in the presentation to support a temporary suspension of nonconforming upgrade requirements.

In the City Council AM Session on Wednesday, June 23rd, Matt Wickstrom with the Bureau of Development Services (BDS) shared a slide deck endorsing the temporary regulatory changes. The proposal seeks to remove the nonconforming upgrade burden on tenants during a post-COVID-19 recovery timeframe. Currently, on projects costing over $306,000, the applicant must spend up to ten percent of the project’s valuation on improving the property to current zoning requirements. Nonconforming upgrades trigger on existing developments where a tenant proposes an alteration or renovations, but site features no longer comply with city standards. These fees can sometimes stifle businesses attempting to fill empty commercial properties as the project costs can increase beyond what their budget will allow. Older buildings are most susceptible to this type of hidden development cost due to the number of regulatory changes made over time.

The proposal would exempt projects from being evaluated for nonconforming improvements until March 21st, 2023. After that date, city staff expects Portland’s economy will have recovered. However, the proposal doesn’t consider project size or the applicant’s ability to pay for the upgrades. As a result, larger projects could slip through without meeting site standards, denying overlooked communities the neighborhood enhancements these rules were designed to provide. Example improvements include tree planting, landscaping, and bicycle parking around the site. Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty expressed reservations over passing this moratorium, fearing that large developers would take the opportunity to shirk their social responsibility to provide projects that meet the cities livability standards.


Nonconforming Upgrades include:

  • Landscaping – particularly parking lot landscaping
  • Screening – separation between differently zoned sites
  • On-site pedestrian circulation
  • Bicycle parking
  • Trees

An amendment to this proposal delayed the final vote until next week. However, it is likely to pass when it next comes to City Council. The passing of this proposal will clear the way for the urgent-care veterinary clinic to proceed unencumbered by the costs of providing parking lot landscaping. Look for updates to this project in the coming months after next week’s vote.

City Council 2021-06-23 AM Session 3:58:08

Transitions Project Building For Lease

The prominent red-brick building on the corner of SE 81st Ave and E Burnside Street is available to lease. Most recently, the building housed the Transitions Project‘s Veteran Services team. The building contains two rentable office spaces that rent separately or as one continuous property.

Located at 8028 E Burnside Street, it also carries the address of 8032 E Burnside Street. Fronted along Burnside Street, this one-level building would support both retail or office use. The property includes an adjacent eight-stall parking lot accessible off SE 81st Ave, where a rear door provides additional entry to the building. A roll-up door accessed off the parking lot allows vehicle and freight entry to the building.

Since 2017, Transitions Project used the build to offer Veteran Services that support individuals who have served in the military and are experiencing houselessness or are in imminent danger of losing their residence. That group outgrew the building and has relocated to a larger office in the Mt. Scott area. Roma Peyser, the Director of Development at Transitions Project, explained the Montavilla location served the organization well over the years. “Our programs and services are always located in buildings that are easily accessible to public transportation and are often placed nearer to where our participants (clients) are finding permanent housing.”

Urban Works Real Estate is leasing the eighteen-year-old building. It is vacant and available for immediate occupancy. Within the leasing-flyer are interior images and a floor plan of the space in its current configuration. Interested renters should contact Tyler Bruss at 503-228-3274.

Wink Vintage on Stark Street

On April 10th, Wink Vintage opened a new shop on SE Stark Street. The owners merged two successful online vintage businesses into their first physical store. Located at 7909 SE Stark Street, this collaboration from Jennifer Strom and Courtney Kimball provides a curated vintage store where anybody can find something they like. 

Having taken over the recently vacated Union Rose space, the store only required minor updates before opening. Outside of painting walls and sanding the floors, the shop was in a usable condition. “They left it in good shape, so there wasn’t a lot of work to be done,” explained Strom. “[We] just adding our own flair,” added Kimball.

Courtney Kimball and Jennifer Strom

Although both are veterans of the vintage sales market, they had day jobs that provided additional income propr to opening this new shop. Kimball has worked for 20 years as a hairstylist and continues to see clients one day a week. Strom left a five-year-long bartending career to pursue her passion for vintage retail full-time. Both are enthusiastic about their new location in Montavilla and have already found foot traffic encouraging when neighboring businesses are open.

The owners are still adding items to the shop, particularly expanding non-clothing goods. However, they are intent on not overcrowding the shop. Items on the racks represent a fraction of what the pair have collected. They regularly scour garage sales, estate sales, and private collections for the best vintage items. Additionally, they invite people to sell items directly to the store. The expanded collection outside the store allows the business to provide personal shopping services. The store staff can hunt for particular items or recommend something based on past interest. They continue to sell online for the many customers across the country and have a devoted audience on the company’s Instagram.

Vintage clothing will not be the extent of the store’s apparel offerings. Working with a local seamstress, Wink Vintage will produce an in-house line using selectively sourced textiles. The backroom will soon become a workspace for clothing production and the occasional alteration of purchased items.

Only a month old, and the shop is already vibrant and active. They are open from 11 AM to 7 PM Wednesday through Saturday and 11 AM to 5 PM on Sundays. Visit them online and in person to get an idea of what items they have, and don’t be shy about asking them if they can find you a particular item.

New Plaza Owners Bet on Retail Growth

The 82nd Street Plaza building recently sold to a group of investors who see opportunity in Montavilla’s expanding downtown. Located at 322 SE 82nd Ave, this 1963 era building sits mid-block just north of Stark Street. The new owners will transform the location through building-wide upgrades that enhance the property’s appearance and functionality.

The owners of this property predict that Montavilla’s retail core is expanding towards this block, provided they create an enticing destination. “This building has a lot of potential… it just needs a facelift and a pivot in the leasing in order to pop,” explained Bob Thomas, one of the building’s owners. The investors are committed to updating the building inside and out, including the already rented spaces. All current tenants received offers to extend leases and negotiate improvement to their units. “Most of our ground-floor tenants have expressed a desire to stay,” said Thomas.

The three-story building has four ground-floor retail shops. Oregon Grown operates both a dispensary and the OG Garden Supply at either end of the building. The All Ways Warm fireplace store was the building’s previous owner and will maintain a retail space on the property. Bánh Mì Nam Lộc Deli occupies the other center spot next to All Ways Warm. The second floor is currently empty, having previously rented to a single tenant who vacated the building before its sale. The basement level has remained unused since the closing of the World Famous Cannabis Cafe in 2014.

Over the next few weeks, the building’s exterior will dramatically change. Darker paint and a cedar-siding band above the first floor will change the current color palette of the building. Crews permanently removed green awnings from the structure, and soon the building will feature a new name. The 82nd Street Plaza will become known as Annex, referencing Montavilla Town’s expansion to this section of 82nd Ave.

UPDATE – Completed exterior

Work is well underway. The parking lot is clear of the extra sheds and storage containers that once cluttered the property. Painters are prepping the building for its new colors, and replacement business signs are already on order for each retail unit.

The second-floor office space was not in rentable condition due to its many alterations over the years. Previous to the external work, all interior finishes on the top floor were removed down to the framing, providing a blank canvas for future tenants. The 5,000 square-foot space is currently available for leases by a single business or divided into several suites.

The property spans five tax lots, with three of them used only for parking. Thomas explained that “there is ample parking at the property currently,” and it’s excessive for the building’s needs. Consequently, the owners are exploring the addition of a food cart pod to the property.

Investment at this level in Montavilla indicates a positive shift for the area. Substantial economic advances will take years to materialize, but this building’s facelift will provide visible proof that change is coming. Businesses interested in leasing space at this location should contact Peak Asset Management by phone or email at (503) 567-8692 and info@peakassetmgt.com.

82nd Street Plaza days before exterior work started

American Agriculture Relocating

Indoor garden and hydroponics supplier American Agriculture will relocate to Oregon City later this month. The current store is located next to Stark Street Pizza at 9220 SE Stark Street. They operated from this location for over a decade, having started the business in 1982.

The 4000 square-foot storefront is currently for lease through Hanna Realty. Businesses interested in this space should call 503-774-8893 or message info@HannaNetwork.com about seeing the space. Look for information regarding American Agriculture’s new location on the company’s website. After the move, Montavilla residents can continue to shop with them through their online store or a short drive to Oregon City.

Union Rose Open in New Location

Union Rose completed the move one block east to a new location. Now at 8029 SE Stark Street, the longtime Montavilla retailer has doubled the shop’s footprint. The storefront exchange, completed two days ago, was briefly documented on the shop’s Instagram account with pictures and a video tour.

The new location also has update hours of operation. The store is open from 10:00 AM to 6:00 PM Tuesday through Saturday, and 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM on Sundays. The store is now closed on Mondays in alignment with the neighboring children’s retailer Beanstalk.

The impending move was previously reported at the beginning of December 2020. The former location of Union Rose will soon be available to rent. Located at 7909 SE Stark street, the vacant shopfront is between Vintage Cocktail Lounge and Redwood restaurant. Union Rose owner, Rita Hudson-Evalt, describe the previous space as “a fantastic location” that the store just outgrew.

The paper is down from the windows at the new Union Rose location. Stroll-by the shop and peek in the expansive storefront windows anytime. Shoppers can drop in to see some of the new items filling the larger store, and everything is also available online for local pickup.

Historic Factory for Sale

The often-overlooked office building at 7305 NE Glisan Street is available to buy or lease. Originally constructed in 1907, many businesses have repurposed this location to serve their needs. Contrary to its appearance today, this location began as a manufacturing hub and home to early Montavilla industry.

Advertisement in the The Oregon daily journal of September 08, 1907

The Standard Broom Co. commissioned the building to house its broom factory. For five decades, they produced household brooms, and later rubber mats, from this location. Brooms manufactured in Montavilla sold to customers throughout the region. Meier and Frank repeatedly featured Standard Broom Co. brooms in advertisements promoting Oregon made products. The company experienced a great deal of success in making their product at this location.

Image from Digital Sanborn Maps Portland 1908-1909

By 1910 Standard Broom Co. expanded to other properties along east Glisan. Sometime between 1924 and 1950, the company expanded to making rubber mats in addition to brooms. Not too long after construction, the building changed addresses from 615 E Glisan to 1865 E Glisan. In the massive renumbering of Portland, the address changed again to 7315 NE Glisan. 

Image from Digital Sanborn Maps Portland 1924

As a factory, the location featured many modern advancements. Listed in Sanborn Maps for 1908-1909, the property had a night watchman, gas lights, and three fire extinguishers. A gasoline engine provided onsite power for the factory. According to the 1924 map, they had electric lights and power off the city grid. Steam provided heat for the building. Broom production remained at this location at least until 1950.

Image from Digital Sanborn Maps Portland 1950

The building is the current home to Harry L. Stearns Inc., an interior lighting, exterior lighting, and lighting controls supplier. The building is for sale with the property fully leases. However, some leasing sites reference vacancy starting in January 2021. That could point to Harry L. Stearns Inc.’s intent to move out of the facility.

The two-story building offers 7,368 square feet of office space. A small gated parking lot on the side of the building provides 16 parking spaces. Although its factory days are behind it, there are many reconfiguration opportunities with this building. Whatever new business takes over the building, this structure has proven that it can reinvent itself.

1894 Storefront for Lease

The storefrontmost recently occupied by H&R Block, is now for lease. Located at 8304 SE Stark Street, it offers 1,754 square feet of office or retail space. Although being the full width of the lot, it is a relatively small building.

Despite its more modern appearance, a portion of this structure dates back to 1894. Original addressed as 2080 E Stark Street, before the renumbering of portland streets in the 1930s, it had a long history of poultry-related operations. Between 1910 and 1920, there were many advertisements for eggs and chicken for sale at this location. 

The property also housed a variety of people during the same period. A listing in The Oregon daily journal of March 12th, 1916, describes a furnished home for rent at this address. The advertisement describes it as a three-room house on a large lot along Base Line Road (the original name of Stark Street). Aside from the access to the streetcar nearby, the text highlights a chicken house on the property.

James Haddon had his residence listed at this property in the Morning Oregonian of July 3rd, 1918. In this obituary notice, Haddon’s mother died while staying with her son at this address.

Haddon may have been renting this location as opposed to owning it. There are many references to the Rothenberger family having resided in and around this property. H.R. Rothenberger sold shoes in Montavilla for most of the early 20th century. His shoe store, located at 2026 E Stark, appears in a shoe advertisement printed in The Sunday Oregonian January 26th, 1913.

Later, H.R. Rothenberger moved his shop to 1988 E Stark Street based on an advertisement in the Morning Oregonian June 9th, 1915. The ad for Martha Washington Comfort Shoes lists H.R. Rothenberger as a seller of those shoes at that new address. A later job listing posted in the Morning Oregonian of January 25th, 1919, confirmed that location as a shoe store. The text of the ad reads, “WANTED – A shoemaker 1988 East Stark.”

1988 East Stark Street also served as a home for H.R. Rothenberger and his wife, Helen Rothenberger. According to The Sunday Oregonian of March 7th, 1920, she died at that location. That obituary lists her as the mother of Max, Robert, Joseph, and Alma Rothenberger. She also had another daughter, only named as Mrs. Chester Stephens.

After Helen Rothenberger’s death, the family seems to have given up on the poultry business at 2080 East Stark. In the Morning Oregonian of April 14th, 1920, all the chicken farm items look to be up to sale under the heading of “Going to California.”

A few years before Helen Rothenberger’s death, her daughter-in-law suffered an injury in a well-publicized accident. The Oregon daily journal of July 18th, 1919, describes an automotive accident involving Mrs. Joseph Rothenberger of 2080 East Stark street. It seems that Joseph Rothenberger and his wife were living at the chicken farm.

The Morning Oregonian of July 18th, 1919, tells a better version of the accident with greater detail. Mrs. Joseph Rothenberger was riding with four other passengers in a truck crossing Johnson Creek. Although not over loaded, the bridge gave way under the vehicle, flipping the truck upside down. Passers-by stopped and rescued the trapped people stuck under the overturned wreckage. Badly bruised in the accident, Mrs. Rothenberger survived with the assistance of local physicians.

Documented activity and 8304 SE Stark Street (2080 East Stark street) trail off after the Rothenberger accident. However, the family’s occupation of the property seems to have continued. A plumbing permit from April 29th, 1948, lists Alma Rothanberger (likely a typo) as the property owner. She is the sister of Joseph Rothenberger and daughter of Helen and H.R. Rothenberger. That document describes a new addition to an old store building. Based on illustrations for the permit, that is likely the shopfront seen street side on Stark today.

A new tenant moving into 8304 SE Stark Street will be continuing in a 100-year-old history of Montavilla commerce. It is easy to forget the history of these buildings as they change occupants. However, recognizing the contributions of the past make for an enriching future.


Interested renters should contact the property owner Dennis Yost at 503-784-2827.

Pacific Plaza Ready for Tenants

Pacific Plaza anchors the busy intersection of 82nd Ave and SE Division. The new retail building finished construction this week and is now seeking tenants. This building represents a significant advancement in the area’s redevelopment, as it transforms into a pedestrian-centric commercial corridor.

The retail location, clad in dark brick, features a towering central entryway of glass and metal. Both design elements draw the attention of people passing through the intersection. The building owners, CSS Properties, choose the material and color pallet for this building carefully. CSS Properties “had a really clear idea about the materiality. They are big fans of masonry and this dark-colored brick that they chose… They had a vision about the two street-facing elevations. Break up the massing somewhat with the parapet line.” Said Nathan Junkert, Project Manager with Scott Edwards Architecture. They knew it would be highly visible and wanted to attract people into the structure.

Part of drawing people into the building starts with creating an open area in front of the building. “We carved out a little bit of space around the bus shelter and main entry to respect that public-facing side of the building.” Said Junkert. Extra space at the corner not only makes the intersection safer for pedestrians but creates a comfortable location for people to transition between the building and street.

Pacific Plaza’s use of a double hight center hallway is a distinctive feature for a multi-tenant retail building of this size. Tenants can utilize both the interior and exterior entryways for their business. Having an indoor promenade in addition to street-side storefronts will expand foot traffic opportunities for shops and restaurants in the building. The hallway connects two enlarged entrances on either side of the structure and bisects the building, creating a north and south half.

Currently, the hallway and utility room are the only completed interior spaces within the building. There are no shared restrooms for the property; each tenant will need to create their own facilities. Both halves of the building are continuous, from front to back, and only crushed rock lines the floor. The retail space is left unfinished to allow future tenants the flexibility in creating their store’s layout. Plumbing for water and sewer extends into each perspective space. Electrical service also is stubbed into the building, connecting to each retail location from the meter-bank outside. The structure has entryways to support up to 14 individual retail establishments. However, tenants will likely occupy larger storefront sections and reduce the building’s overall number of shops.

According to Alexi Meuwissen, Director of Marketing and Business Development with Scott Edwards Architecture, CSS Properties are actively seeking specific prospects. “The owners do not have any tenants secured yet, but they are targeting the following: Starbucks, Subway, Verizon, FedEx, and physical therapy.” Building designers envisioned food service as a potential use for this site. “Grease interceptors are already installed. It’s well-prepped for restaurants.” Said General Contractor Jef Krohn with Joseph Hughes Construction (JHC).

It is easy to envision restaurants in this location because of its history of housing eateries. This site had previously been the decade-long home to the Hung Far Low restaurant. Over its history, this corner lot supported a hundred years of successful business in Portland. That constant occupation and redevelopment complicated construction when digging drywells for the project. “When we did dig this thing up, there was so much stuff underneath this building that had been here for hundreds of years.” Said Krohn.

Further complicating the construction of the building was its proximity to the building at 8245 SE Division Street. That structure is within 14 inches of Pacific Plaza’s east wall. Being so close to the building prevented them from installing brick veneer from the outside of the building. That restriction required switching building materials from a standard steel frame structure to a structural brick wall on that side of the building. “We had to lay all the brick from the inside,” explained Krohn. Scott Edwards Architecture had to adjust the plans as the project was underway. “We had to think on our feet,” described Junkert. The outward appearance is indistinguishable between the two types of wall construction. However, it was an example of the unseen challenges they faced.

Another difficulty for the project came from COVID-19. This project completed in just over seven months, despite being in the middle of a pandemic. During the crisis, steel suppliers shut down, forcing builders to seek out new sources. Workplace safety policies frequently changed during the project, creating delays from adjusting to safety rules and sourcing different protective equipment.

Regardless of challenges, the project team is pleased with the timely delivery and quality of what they have created. Buildings replaced as part of 82nd Ave’s revitalization can create some public concern. There is an understanding that new structures are shaping the maturing character along the street. Junkert expressed his desire that the building’s placement and design will complement the neighborhood. “We are hopeful that occupying the corner and building out the street frontage will have a positive effect on 82nd and the Jade District in general.”

More people are living near this section of town, and not just driving to it. The building is a successful compromise between 82nd Avenue’s history as a car-centric street and its future as a pedestrian-friendly community space. Pacific Plaza has a healthy amount of onsite parking, accessible from 82nd Ave and SE 83rd Ave. Despite parking availability, this building focusses on pedestrians. Every side of this development has large windows and entrances to the property. It will have activity in all directions and encourage people to travel through and around the building.

Rendering courtesy of Scott|Edwards Architecture.

CSS Properties had ideas of what type of businesses would fit here when the project begin. However, COVID-19 has shifted those expectations towards a greater variety of possible occupants. They are willing to work with any interested tenant and are devoted to making the building suitable for prospective businesses.

Pacific Plaza represents an accelerated transformation of both 82nd Ave and SE Division. This area once had only business lining the street, and they catered to automobile access. With the opening of the Orchards of 82nd apartment building at this intersection, the area is firmly a community of residents and businesses. The shops of Pacific Plaza should expect local customers to travel on foot and create an establishment serving those customers’ needs. They have an opportunity to further transform these cross streets in a positive direction by providing services for both residents and visitors.


Pacific Plaza is located at 2464 SE 82nd Ave