Category: Property Lease

Union Rose Open in New Location

Union Rose completed the move one block east to a new location. Now at 8029 SE Stark Street, the longtime Montavilla retailer has doubled the shop’s footprint. The storefront exchange, completed two days ago, was briefly documented on the shop’s Instagram account with pictures and a video tour.

The new location also has update hours of operation. The store is open from 10:00 AM to 6:00 PM Tuesday through Saturday, and 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM on Sundays. The store is now closed on Mondays in alignment with the neighboring children’s retailer Beanstalk.

The impending move was previously reported at the beginning of December 2020. The former location of Union Rose will soon be available to rent. Located at 7909 SE Stark street, the vacant shopfront is between Vintage Cocktail Lounge and Redwood restaurant. Union Rose owner, Rita Hudson-Evalt, describe the previous space as “a fantastic location” that the store just outgrew.

The paper is down from the windows at the new Union Rose location. Stroll-by the shop and peek in the expansive storefront windows anytime. Shoppers can drop in to see some of the new items filling the larger store, and everything is also available online for local pickup.

Historic Factory for Sale

The often-overlooked office building at 7305 NE Glisan Street is available to buy or lease. Originally constructed in 1907, many businesses have repurposed this location to serve their needs. Contrary to its appearance today, this location began as a manufacturing hub and home to early Montavilla industry.

Advertisement in the The Oregon daily journal of September 08, 1907

The Standard Broom Co. commissioned the building to house its broom factory. For five decades, they produced household brooms, and later rubber mats, from this location. Brooms manufactured in Montavilla sold to customers throughout the region. Meier and Frank repeatedly featured Standard Broom Co. brooms in advertisements promoting Oregon made products. The company experienced a great deal of success in making their product at this location.

Image from Digital Sanborn Maps Portland 1908-1909

By 1910 Standard Broom Co. expanded to other properties along east Glisan. Sometime between 1924 and 1950, the company expanded to making rubber mats in addition to brooms. Not too long after construction, the building changed addresses from 615 E Glisan to 1865 E Glisan. In the massive renumbering of Portland, the address changed again to 7315 NE Glisan. 

Image from Digital Sanborn Maps Portland 1924

As a factory, the location featured many modern advancements. Listed in Sanborn Maps for 1908-1909, the property had a night watchman, gas lights, and three fire extinguishers. A gasoline engine provided onsite power for the factory. According to the 1924 map, they had electric lights and power off the city grid. Steam provided heat for the building. Broom production remained at this location at least until 1950.

Image from Digital Sanborn Maps Portland 1950

The building is the current home to Harry L. Stearns Inc., an interior lighting, exterior lighting, and lighting controls supplier. The building is for sale with the property fully leases. However, some leasing sites reference vacancy starting in January 2021. That could point to Harry L. Stearns Inc.’s intent to move out of the facility.

The two-story building offers 7,368 square feet of office space. A small gated parking lot on the side of the building provides 16 parking spaces. Although its factory days are behind it, there are many reconfiguration opportunities with this building. Whatever new business takes over the building, this structure has proven that it can reinvent itself.

1894 Storefront for Lease

The storefrontmost recently occupied by H&R Block, is now for lease. Located at 8304 SE Stark Street, it offers 1,754 square feet of office or retail space. Although being the full width of the lot, it is a relatively small building.

Despite its more modern appearance, a portion of this structure dates back to 1894. Original addressed as 2080 E Stark Street, before the renumbering of portland streets in the 1930s, it had a long history of poultry-related operations. Between 1910 and 1920, there were many advertisements for eggs and chicken for sale at this location. 

The property also housed a variety of people during the same period. A listing in The Oregon daily journal of March 12th, 1916, describes a furnished home for rent at this address. The advertisement describes it as a three-room house on a large lot along Base Line Road (the original name of Stark Street). Aside from the access to the streetcar nearby, the text highlights a chicken house on the property.

James Haddon had his residence listed at this property in the Morning Oregonian of July 3rd, 1918. In this obituary notice, Haddon’s mother died while staying with her son at this address.

Haddon may have been renting this location as opposed to owning it. There are many references to the Rothenberger family having resided in and around this property. H.R. Rothenberger sold shoes in Montavilla for most of the early 20th century. His shoe store, located at 2026 E Stark, appears in a shoe advertisement printed in The Sunday Oregonian January 26th, 1913.

Later, H.R. Rothenberger moved his shop to 1988 E Stark Street based on an advertisement in the Morning Oregonian June 9th, 1915. The ad for Martha Washington Comfort Shoes lists H.R. Rothenberger as a seller of those shoes at that new address. A later job listing posted in the Morning Oregonian of January 25th, 1919, confirmed that location as a shoe store. The text of the ad reads, “WANTED – A shoemaker 1988 East Stark.”

1988 East Stark Street also served as a home for H.R. Rothenberger and his wife, Helen Rothenberger. According to The Sunday Oregonian of March 7th, 1920, she died at that location. That obituary lists her as the mother of Max, Robert, Joseph, and Alma Rothenberger. She also had another daughter, only named as Mrs. Chester Stephens.

After Helen Rothenberger’s death, the family seems to have given up on the poultry business at 2080 East Stark. In the Morning Oregonian of April 14th, 1920, all the chicken farm items look to be up to sale under the heading of “Going to California.”

A few years before Helen Rothenberger’s death, her daughter-in-law suffered an injury in a well-publicized accident. The Oregon daily journal of July 18th, 1919, describes an automotive accident involving Mrs. Joseph Rothenberger of 2080 East Stark street. It seems that Joseph Rothenberger and his wife were living at the chicken farm.

The Morning Oregonian of July 18th, 1919, tells a better version of the accident with greater detail. Mrs. Joseph Rothenberger was riding with four other passengers in a truck crossing Johnson Creek. Although not over loaded, the bridge gave way under the vehicle, flipping the truck upside down. Passers-by stopped and rescued the trapped people stuck under the overturned wreckage. Badly bruised in the accident, Mrs. Rothenberger survived with the assistance of local physicians.

Documented activity and 8304 SE Stark Street (2080 East Stark street) trail off after the Rothenberger accident. However, the family’s occupation of the property seems to have continued. A plumbing permit from April 29th, 1948, lists Alma Rothanberger (likely a typo) as the property owner. She is the sister of Joseph Rothenberger and daughter of Helen and H.R. Rothenberger. That document describes a new addition to an old store building. Based on illustrations for the permit, that is likely the shopfront seen street side on Stark today.

A new tenant moving into 8304 SE Stark Street will be continuing in a 100-year-old history of Montavilla commerce. It is easy to forget the history of these buildings as they change occupants. However, recognizing the contributions of the past make for an enriching future.


Interested renters should contact the property owner Dennis Yost at 503-784-2827.

Pacific Plaza Ready for Tenants

Pacific Plaza anchors the busy intersection of 82nd Ave and SE Division. The new retail building finished construction this week and is now seeking tenants. This building represents a significant advancement in the area’s redevelopment, as it transforms into a pedestrian-centric commercial corridor.

The retail location, clad in dark brick, features a towering central entryway of glass and metal. Both design elements draw the attention of people passing through the intersection. The building owners, CSS Properties, choose the material and color pallet for this building carefully. CSS Properties “had a really clear idea about the materiality. They are big fans of masonry and this dark-colored brick that they chose… They had a vision about the two street-facing elevations. Break up the massing somewhat with the parapet line.” Said Nathan Junkert, Project Manager with Scott Edwards Architecture. They knew it would be highly visible and wanted to attract people into the structure.

Part of drawing people into the building starts with creating an open area in front of the building. “We carved out a little bit of space around the bus shelter and main entry to respect that public-facing side of the building.” Said Junkert. Extra space at the corner not only makes the intersection safer for pedestrians but creates a comfortable location for people to transition between the building and street.

Pacific Plaza’s use of a double hight center hallway is a distinctive feature for a multi-tenant retail building of this size. Tenants can utilize both the interior and exterior entryways for their business. Having an indoor promenade in addition to street-side storefronts will expand foot traffic opportunities for shops and restaurants in the building. The hallway connects two enlarged entrances on either side of the structure and bisects the building, creating a north and south half.

Currently, the hallway and utility room are the only completed interior spaces within the building. There are no shared restrooms for the property; each tenant will need to create their own facilities. Both halves of the building are continuous, from front to back, and only crushed rock lines the floor. The retail space is left unfinished to allow future tenants the flexibility in creating their store’s layout. Plumbing for water and sewer extends into each perspective space. Electrical service also is stubbed into the building, connecting to each retail location from the meter-bank outside. The structure has entryways to support up to 14 individual retail establishments. However, tenants will likely occupy larger storefront sections and reduce the building’s overall number of shops.

According to Alexi Meuwissen, Director of Marketing and Business Development with Scott Edwards Architecture, CSS Properties are actively seeking specific prospects. “The owners do not have any tenants secured yet, but they are targeting the following: Starbucks, Subway, Verizon, FedEx, and physical therapy.” Building designers envisioned food service as a potential use for this site. “Grease interceptors are already installed. It’s well-prepped for restaurants.” Said General Contractor Jef Krohn with Joseph Hughes Construction (JHC).

It is easy to envision restaurants in this location because of its history of housing eateries. This site had previously been the decade-long home to the Hung Far Low restaurant. Over its history, this corner lot supported a hundred years of successful business in Portland. That constant occupation and redevelopment complicated construction when digging drywells for the project. “When we did dig this thing up, there was so much stuff underneath this building that had been here for hundreds of years.” Said Krohn.

Further complicating the construction of the building was its proximity to the building at 8245 SE Division Street. That structure is within 14 inches of Pacific Plaza’s east wall. Being so close to the building prevented them from installing brick veneer from the outside of the building. That restriction required switching building materials from a standard steel frame structure to a structural brick wall on that side of the building. “We had to lay all the brick from the inside,” explained Krohn. Scott Edwards Architecture had to adjust the plans as the project was underway. “We had to think on our feet,” described Junkert. The outward appearance is indistinguishable between the two types of wall construction. However, it was an example of the unseen challenges they faced.

Another difficulty for the project came from COVID-19. This project completed in just over seven months, despite being in the middle of a pandemic. During the crisis, steel suppliers shut down, forcing builders to seek out new sources. Workplace safety policies frequently changed during the project, creating delays from adjusting to safety rules and sourcing different protective equipment.

Regardless of challenges, the project team is pleased with the timely delivery and quality of what they have created. Buildings replaced as part of 82nd Ave’s revitalization can create some public concern. There is an understanding that new structures are shaping the maturing character along the street. Junkert expressed his desire that the building’s placement and design will complement the neighborhood. “We are hopeful that occupying the corner and building out the street frontage will have a positive effect on 82nd and the Jade District in general.”

More people are living near this section of town, and not just driving to it. The building is a successful compromise between 82nd Avenue’s history as a car-centric street and its future as a pedestrian-friendly community space. Pacific Plaza has a healthy amount of onsite parking, accessible from 82nd Ave and SE 83rd Ave. Despite parking availability, this building focusses on pedestrians. Every side of this development has large windows and entrances to the property. It will have activity in all directions and encourage people to travel through and around the building.

Rendering courtesy of Scott|Edwards Architecture.

CSS Properties had ideas of what type of businesses would fit here when the project begin. However, COVID-19 has shifted those expectations towards a greater variety of possible occupants. They are willing to work with any interested tenant and are devoted to making the building suitable for prospective businesses.

Pacific Plaza represents an accelerated transformation of both 82nd Ave and SE Division. This area once had only business lining the street, and they catered to automobile access. With the opening of the Orchards of 82nd apartment building at this intersection, the area is firmly a community of residents and businesses. The shops of Pacific Plaza should expect local customers to travel on foot and create an establishment serving those customers’ needs. They have an opportunity to further transform these cross streets in a positive direction by providing services for both residents and visitors.


Pacific Plaza is located at 2464 SE 82nd Ave

1911 Storefront for Lease

A handwritten sign in the window of 6900 NE Glisan Street advertises that the storefront is for lease. This corner building is looking for its next business to house, just as it has for over 100 years. First built in 1911 for W. Heinen, the structure’s design created a store on the first floor and a dwelling above.

Originally built with an address of 1780 E Glisan Street, it most commonly was addressed as 1772 E Glisan Street. The address 1776 E Glisan also was associated with this location before it finally moving to the new address system used today.

Many groceries have occupied this location in its first fifty years, although most names are no longer know. Newspaper advertisements and articles have preserved some of that history, as well as plumbing records.

Kaia and Inga Casperson at confectionery 69th and Glisan. Courtesy Kevin Dorney

1915 – Casperson & Jensen Confectionery, served Celro-Kola for 5-cents at their soda fountain. Morning Oregonian, May 22, 1915, and The Oregon daily journal, April 05, 1915.

1922 – Charles Ingram of White Front grocery reported taking a counterfeit $20 bill from a woman trying to use it for 30-cents of groceries. Morning Oregonian, April 05, 1922.

1958 – Historic Plumbing Permit lists the business name as Hill Crest Grocery.

Kaia and Inga Casperson at confectionery 69th and Glisan. Courtesy Kevin Dorney

As a central business in the community, it served as an election polling location for many elections.

1914 – Listed it as an Election Polling Place The Oregon daily journal, May 14, 1914.

1919 – Listed it as an Election Polling Place The Oregon daily journal, November 11, 1919.

1920 – Listed it as an Election Polling Place. The Sunday OregonianOctober 31, 1920.

The century of service has been tough on this building, and it could use some updates. However, it has stood many tests of time and is ready for the next great business to open its doors at this location. People interested in continuing the long tradition of community retail at this address should email 6900NEglisan@gmail.com.


UPDATED – Added photos from Kevin Dorney’s collection showing Kaia and Inga Casperson at their confectionery. Pictures are undated.

Stark Street Storefront for Lease

3,750 square feet of storefront space is available for lease on SE Stark Street. Recently the home to CrossFit Montavilla, this property is in the heart of Montavilla town.

Located at 8040 SE Stark Street, the space has two bathrooms and dedicated parking in rear of building. The parking lot is accessible off SE Washingtons Street and has a commercial rollup door for freight delivery or drive in access.

Call (503) 807-1112 if interested in the space.

Metro Leasing TBN Site

Portland Metro has placed the former Trinity Broadcasting Network (TBN) location up for short term lease. While Metro develops a plan to convert the site into affordable housing, they hope to generate some revenue out of the property. This listing also confirms the timeline for Metro’s proposed transformation of the property.

Listed by Colliers International, the Glisan Street property is available for one or two-year terms. The flyer for the site states that it’s “ideal uses would include schools, theater, camp, short term office requirements, nonprofit uses.”

At a lease rate of $1.00/mo/foot, this is an affordable location for a short term project. Montavilla has a good number of available storefronts, but few with this much parking. It will be a challenging listing, requiring a specific type of renter with short term goals. With some luck, they will find someone to make this space lively until it’s redevelopment.

For decades this property at 432 NE 74th Ave was closed to the public, its large parking lot sitting empty and gated off. The listing flyer offers a rare glimpse inside the building. If nothing else happens to this building before its demolition, at least the listing ends the mystery surrounding its inner workings.


Leasing Contact and additional information

Scott MacLean
503 223-3123 or scott.maclean@colliers.com

Stark Street Corner Shopfront for Lease

The corner storefront located at 8037 SE Stark Street is now available for lease. Formerly occupied by Wix Insurance Agency, it was made vacant when they moved into their own building at 7300 NE Glisan Street.

Two spaces are vacant in the building. In addition to the Wix space, 8029 SE Stark Street is also available. It had been the home to the renowned Tanuki that closed in late 2018.

The Stark Street properties are listed through M Maltase Real Estate. Contact Michelle Maltase at (503) 730-2596 if interested.

Sunlight Solar Closing Location

Sunlight Solar’s office and warehouse location, on East Burnside street, is closing. The building owners are now advertising that the space, at 7935 E Burnside Street, is available to lease. Sunlight Solar Energy Inc. continue to operate other locations in Oregon and elsewhere.

The commercial building is a located on the corner of E Burnside and NE 80th Ave. It is fronted on Burnside Street with a two car parking lot accessible from NE 80th. David Smith has owned this building since 2016. Smith bought it from his friend, who operated Watson Plumbing Company at this location.

The building was first constructed in 1990 and was more recently updated in 2016, just before Sunlight Solar Energy occupied the space. The building offers 3,000 sq. ft. of heated Warehouse space. It has two bathrooms and two offices. The office space is near 300 sq. ft. in size.

David Smith has already received interest in the space, however, he is looking for the right type of tenant. He describes the space as being ideal for a contractor or trades company, due to its two commercial rollup doors. Those doors make it easy to drive work vehicles inside, for restock and security. However, Smith is open to new uses for the building. It would be great to bring in an active business that is “helpful to the community and contributes to the area.” Said Smith in a phone interview.

This building is located at a nexus of car and bike travel. As 80th Ave continues to grow into a future Greenway, both bike and pedestrian travel is increasing along its roads and sidewalk. Burnside continues to be a well traveled path for bus and car transit. Sitting at such an intersection, would make in an ideal location for a Ghost Kitchen. That business being reliant on both bike and car couriers. When asked about posible uses for the space, Smith seemed encouraged by ideas like a Ghost Kitchen or other community serving businesses. “Perhaps the era of construction business is over for the building,” said Smith.

Smith has a long history of restoring or developing Portland buildings and has lived in the area most of his life. This is his only Montavilla property but his admiration for the neighborhood, keeps him engaged in future opportunities. He is excited to see what future business will take residence in his building, and is interested in how that business will support the neighborhood.

Business owners looking to lease this location are encouraged to call 503-695-5858, and speak to David Smith. As E burnside and 80th Ave become more active with businesses, this corner should play a significant role in the areas growth.