Category: History

Union Rose Moving Locations on Stark

Union Rose is moving down the street to a new storefront at 8029 SE Stark Street. Currently, they are located a block east on the same side of Stark Street. The larger space will allow for more onsite manufacturing of women’s clothing and expanded gift-items available in the shop.

Owner Rita Hudson-Evalt was excited to find a new place nearby. “I love being in Montavilla,” remarked Hudson-Evalt when describing the short move. Staying in the neighborhood is essential for the business and staying on the street ensures minimal disruption for customers. Union Rose has been in its current location since before Hudson-Evalt bought the store in 2014. The original owner, Nicole Prevost, opened the store on Martin Luther King Jr Blvd in 2007 and moved to Montavilla not too long after that. Hudson-Evalt was a designer, selling to the store when Prevost was looking to leave the business. “I couldn’t handle the place not being around,” explained Hudson-Evalt when describing why she bought the shop.

Six years later, the store is continuing to survive in the pandemic thanks to a loyal customer base and the online store’s success. “We are going to make it through,” Hudson-Evalt said with a tone of relief. Doubling the store’s floor space affirms the businesses’ health and positions the company to be more flexible as the economy changes and recovers.

The rough outline of the future storefront

The store will shut down its old location on December 28th and reopen in the new storefront around January 6th. Hudson-Evalt will bring clothing production entirely onsite, moving from the basement studio where much of the work happens today. The back portion of the new shop becomes dedicated to product creation. A curtain behind the counter will hide overly messy projects, but most times it will remain open to show customers the process.

Union Rose’s location at 7909 SE Stark Street will become available in the new year. “It was a fantastic location,” according to Hudson-Evalt. Growing out of the space was the only issue for the company. Montavilla retail space is affordable with accommodating building management. “Both landlords have been great,” said Hudson-Evalt about the process of switching locations. For instance, the new owner of 8029 SE Stark Street upgraded the front windows to new energy-efficient glass, retaining the old appearance with improved comfort.

Sanborn Map 1924

The future home of Union Rose previously housed Tanuki and other restraints. The building’s history began in 1924. This particular space had an address of 2019 E Stark Street before the street renumbering of the 1930s. The first business listing at that address was for The Pastime pool hall. A 1926 advertisement in the Montavilla Times declares it “Where All Good Fellows Meet.”

Montavilla Times March 25th 1926

This move is an exciting shuffle of Stark Street businesses. Carmen Ripley, the owner of Beanstalk Children’s Resale Clothing, expressed excitement about Union Rose’s future move to the storefront next to her shop. The two apparel stores should complement each other’s business with minimal overlap in offerings. The new year will bring many changes to the neighborhood, and Union Rose’s move seems to be only positive for the community.

Vintage Store in Vintage Building

Tigersden Vintage recently moved into the storefront at 7035 NE Glisan Street. The vintage store has over five years of experience selling online with Etsy, eBay, and now a Shopify store. This year they opened the Montavilla shop on Glisan and are currently displaying merchandise street-side.

Tigersden Vintage describes itself as a curated clothing and home goods resale shop. Opening any brick-and-mortar store during a pandemic is challenging. However, this business has established roots in online sales, positioning it better than other local stores expanding into website retail for the first time.

The building is the former home of the 12 X 12 Club, an establishment offering meeting space for 12-Step Recovery programs. Founded in 1990, the non-profit organization used this location to support people in recovery through a host of services. An established recovery community took root at this storefront, as did other businesses before it.

The building’s origin begins in 1917 at the hands of the first occupants. The Schultz brothers built this two-story building to house their plumbing business. Schultz Bros. Plumbing operated at this location from construction through the 1920s. The business owners potentially lived above the store during those years.

Sanborn map 1924

The property had an address of 1807 E Glisan Street before being renumbered in the 1930s. The Morning Oregonian on May 25th of 1916 recorded the original construction price for the building. “SCHULTZ BROS. – Erect two-story frame dwelling, 1807 East Glisan street, between East Seventieth and East Seventy-first streets: builder, same: $1800” By March 4th, 1917, the brothers posted their first advertisement for services in The Oregon daily journal. “SCHULTZ BROS., 1807 E. Glisan St. Tabor 1154. Also Supplies”

On October 20th of 1919, The Oregon daily journal listed $100 worth of repairs to the store. Although listed as a repair, that description also applied to other building upgrades. As with the building’s construction, the brothers list themselves as the contractors performing work. Early in the 1920s, the business became a member of the Portland Master Plumbers Association. The brothers’ affiliation is advertised in The Oregon daily journal of July 5th, 1922.

Also, in 1922, The Oregon daily journal from August 2nd has a posting offering a reward for a lost item. “Lost – Khaki-colored auto tent between Portland and Cascade Locks. Liberal reward. 1807 E. Glisan Phone Tabor 1154.” Auto Tents were an early version of camping trailers designed to fit inside or attache to cars. They offered roadside camping to car owners and could cost a considerable amount. This post hints at the brothers’ recreational activities and demonstrates a level of financial success.

Schultz Bros. Plumbing quietly disappeared from records after 1924 when W. J. Schultz sold his interest in the business to George F. Schultz. In 1964 new owners are listed on a plumbing permit for the building. The history of businesses at this address begins again with the 12 X 12 Club, and now Tigersden Vintage.

It seems fitting that a vintage shop would take residence in a centuries-old building. Beyond its appropriate placement, having an active storefront in that location helps Glisan grow as a shopping and dining destination. Visit Tigersden Vintage Tuesday through Thursday, Saturday, and Sunday between 11 AM to 7 PM. Or online at tigersdenvintage.com.

Citrine Bloom on Glisan

Citrine Bloom recently relocated to 7114 NE Glisan Street in Montavilla. The plant store moved from its original location at 4136 SE 42nd Ave in August. Making plants affordable, accessible, and manageable for all people is a core goal for the shop’s owner.

Jessica Pierce created Citrine Bloom with the principle values of community support and the joy of plants. Plants had become too serious, according to Pierce. The store’s design is approachable by anyone trying to make their life better through added foliage. Additionally, the shop features products from a select group of vendors. All makers are female-identifying or people of color. Pierce wants to encourage these small business people and makers who need early support in their ventures.

Citrine Bloom moved to Montavilla to be closer to existing customers. Like many Portland businesses, the shop is closed to the public during the pandemic. However, they have an online store featuring many of their products. Pierce delivers those products, and moving to the building on Glisan Street cuts down those delivery times.

The building Citrine Bloom moved into is over 100-years-old. Most recently, the storefront was a hobby shop, but the building’s history started in 1914. Originally this building contained just two storefronts instead of the three that it has today. The addresses were 1828 and 1830 E Glisan Street before the Portland street renumbering in the 1930s. The half of the building now occupied by the plant store was a local creamery, according to the 1924 Sanborn map. Years later, the building expanded to fill in the alleyway between the structure and its westward neighbor, creating an additional shop.

Pierce hopes to open Citrine Bloom’s storefront for shoppers in December. However, that is dependent on how safe it will be to do so. Until then, the online shop is available for orders, and staff can assist by phone at 503-395-0032.

William Miller Building on Glisan

The building at 7815 NE Glisan Street does not bear the name of its original owner. However, for over a quarter-century, William Miller’s building stood at this location. Miller built several buildings for his plumbing business on the property, and his store would have been a landmark on Glisan.

Image courtesy Otter Wax

The recorded history of the building begins in 1909 with Sandborn maps show the structure labeled as Plumbing. It is smaller in scale than the building seen today, indicating that the current building replaced it. The original address was 209 E Glisan; it soon changed to 1957 E Glisan. The first evidence of this building belonging to William Miller comes from an advertisement in The Oregon daily journal of May 15th, 1915. In the posting, Wm. Miller is selling a horse and accessories at 1957 E Glisan Street.

209 (1957) E Glisan – Portland Digital Sanborn 1909

A vendor advertisement in the Morning Oregonian for July 5th, 1920, lists Miller’s shop. In the ad, Wm. Miller is within a list of distributors for Superbo automatic water heaters. Miller placed his own advertisement in The Oregon daily journal of June 8th, 1921. There he promoted his reasonably priced and durable sewer line work. However, the ad contains a typo that hopefully yielded a discount on the price he paid the newspaper.

Portland Maps indicates the existing building’s construction year as 1923. The October 1922 plumbing permit for the building shows Wm. Miller as both the owner and contractor for the new building’s sewer line connection. By the 1928 Sanborn map’s creation, the building consists of a two-story store with “Some Paints” noted on the map. Paint supplies at the location could indicate that Miller had expanded his operation into a more generalized building material store.

1957 E Glisan – Portland Digital Sanborn 1928

William Miller changed pace by 1930. That year a plumbing permit indicated the location became a Soda Fountain shop, and Miller was not the contractor doing the plumbing work. Finally, by 1940, Miller no longer owned the building. December of that year, a plumbing permit indicated that Golden Age Products Co. owned the building, and it was in-use as a Clinic.

For many years businesses used the storefront at 7817 NE Glisan, while people lived above at 7815 NE Glisan. Most recently, Glisan Street Saddlery had a shop on the first floor. Now the whole building is used by Otter Wax, a maker of all-natural Fabric Care, Leather Care, and Apothecary products. It is just another example of the 100-year-old retail legacy along Glisan that owes recognition to the people who created it.


UPDATED – Added information about new building owners Otter Wax. Added original building image.

Drug Store of Indeterminate Age

Located at 7935 NE Glisan Street is the unused half of the Hanoi Kitchen building. The city of Portland documents indicates the whole structure dates to a 1955 development. However, that date only represents the western single-story half of the building. The two-story eastern portion of the building dates back much further.

Originally the building at the corner of NE 80th Ave and Glisan Street had an address of 2003 East Glisan. It was home to W. E. Fowler’s Drug Store. Some documents noted the business as Fowler Drug Co. The date of construction is unknown, nor is the date Fowler moved his business to this address.

2003 E Glisan – Portland Digital Sanborn 1924

By 1917, mentions of W. E. Fowler’s corner shop appears in both The Sunday Oregonian and The Oregon daily journal. The publications included the store name and address as part of product advertising. The Oregon daily journal for September 24th, 1920, identified W. E. Fowler’s Drug Store as the special voter registration location for the Montavilla district.

7935 Glisan – Portland Digital Sanborn 1950

Just two days later, on September 26nd, The Oregon daily journal reported that Mrs. Ivy McBride took poison obtained at Fowlers Drug Store to kill herself. Fowler rushed to the site to provide an antidote; however, Ivy McBride fought his efforts and ultimately died due to ingesting the poison.

Undeterred by the tragedy, Fowler appears as a Druggist selling Yeast Foam Tablets in The Sunday Oregonian‘s 1922 advertisement for the product. Many years later, a 1977 plumbing permit is the last listing of Fowler Drug Store. These records document more than sixty years that Fowler supplied the community with drug store services.

The Montavilla Times October 23rd, 1931

By 1931, the name had changed to The Drug Shop. The name change was noted in an advertisement in The Montavilla Times of October 23rd. The name remained in use until at least 1981. Last being seen in a PGE advertisement appearing on page two of the April 2nd Dayton Tribune.

For decades the shopfront has remained empty, with all business activity occurring in the 1955 built portion of the structure. Perhaps as retail operations grow along Glisan, refurbishing this storefront will become a priority.


UPDATED – Added advertisement from 1931 as supplied by a Facebook reader.

Curb Ramp Work at SE 91st and Burnside

UPDATE – New curb ramps are completed at SE 91st Ave and E Burnside Frontage Road.


Update from October 11th, 2020.

UPDATE – New curb ramps are under construction at SE 91st Ave and E Burnside Frontage Road. The old curbs and sidewalk are now removed. The ground is prepared with crushed rock for reconstruction. The next phase will see forms laid and soon after pouring of concrete.


Original Story published September 3rd

New curb ramps are coming to SE 91st Ave and E Burnside Frontage Road. The corners are marked with cut lines and construction markings ahead of curb reconstruction.

Hannah Schafer, with the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT), commented that this intersection is “having the existing curb ramps reconstructed to meet current ADA standards as part of our ongoing updates to curb ramps across the city.”

This stretch of roadway has long been neglected, with one curb recessed to near road-surface level. Sidewalks are only present on Burnside Frontage Road, and PBOT has no plans to expand them along SE 91st Ave during this project.

A historically separated two-block portion of E Burnside runs parallel to the current path of E Burnside. Often listed as E Burnside Frontage Road, it was created when Burnside became a major road for traveling east. City engineers straightened the road to make Burnside continuous, leaving this section of Burnside wider. Later, Burnside was made a standard width creating this short frontage road. The 1928 Sanborn map illustrates the 12 block tract of land that shifted the streets off the standard grid.

Digital Sanborn Maps 1928

This article will be updated when construction begins.

Historic Factory for Sale

The often-overlooked office building at 7305 NE Glisan Street is available to buy or lease. Originally constructed in 1907, many businesses have repurposed this location to serve their needs. Contrary to its appearance today, this location began as a manufacturing hub and home to early Montavilla industry.

Advertisement in the The Oregon daily journal of September 08, 1907

The Standard Broom Co. commissioned the building to house its broom factory. For five decades, they produced household brooms, and later rubber mats, from this location. Brooms manufactured in Montavilla sold to customers throughout the region. Meier and Frank repeatedly featured Standard Broom Co. brooms in advertisements promoting Oregon made products. The company experienced a great deal of success in making their product at this location.

Image from Digital Sanborn Maps Portland 1908-1909

By 1910 Standard Broom Co. expanded to other properties along east Glisan. Sometime between 1924 and 1950, the company expanded to making rubber mats in addition to brooms. Not too long after construction, the building changed addresses from 615 E Glisan to 1865 E Glisan. In the massive renumbering of Portland, the address changed again to 7315 NE Glisan. 

Image from Digital Sanborn Maps Portland 1924

As a factory, the location featured many modern advancements. Listed in Sanborn Maps for 1908-1909, the property had a night watchman, gas lights, and three fire extinguishers. A gasoline engine provided onsite power for the factory. According to the 1924 map, they had electric lights and power off the city grid. Steam provided heat for the building. Broom production remained at this location at least until 1950.

Image from Digital Sanborn Maps Portland 1950

The building is the current home to Harry L. Stearns Inc., an interior lighting, exterior lighting, and lighting controls supplier. The building is for sale with the property fully leases. However, some leasing sites reference vacancy starting in January 2021. That could point to Harry L. Stearns Inc.’s intent to move out of the facility.

The two-story building offers 7,368 square feet of office space. A small gated parking lot on the side of the building provides 16 parking spaces. Although its factory days are behind it, there are many reconfiguration opportunities with this building. Whatever new business takes over the building, this structure has proven that it can reinvent itself.

Forgotten Parking Lot

The long-unused parking lot at 7601 SE Division Street remains on the market. After selling to investors in 2015, the owner attempted several housing projects on the site. None of those seem to have moved past planning, and the property remains for sale.

Originally this location had an address of 1927 Division Street before the renumbering of Portland streets. The property was owned by the Pickard family as early as 1916. That year, the Morning Oregonian of March 29th and September 7th, listed it as the home address for George B. Pickard.

A few years later, The Oregon daily journal of August 15th, 1922, reported this location as the home of Mrs. Josephine Pickard. That same year Clarence Larsen was said to live at that address by the August 22 Morning Oregonian.

Before the 2015 sale to its current owners, 7601 SE Division Street served as employee parking for the Kaiser clinic. The secure parking lot featured 60 parking spaces and electronic gates on a 40,075 square-foot lot. The property went for sale in 2014 after the Kaiser clinic closed.

The nearby Portland Community college (PCC) considered purchasing it at their July 17th Board of Directors meeting that year. The asking price for the property was one million dollars. Beyond the over market rate asking price, other complications are documented in the PCC Board agenda notes.

“A significant complicating factor is that zoning for the property is uncertain. Staff’s view is that Kaiser’s need to provide for employee parking developed after the clinic’s development. In response to neighbor concerns, it appears that the City granted a temporary zoning change from R2 (residential) to CN2 (neighborhood commercial) to allow the property to be developed as Kaiser employee parking. It appears that this zoning action required that the zoning reverts to R2 upon a change in ownership. It further appears that this rezoning to CN2 occurred via a process that is no longer permitted, so the process for the zoning reversion is unclear.”

PCC investigated the purchase but ultimately declined to move forward. The following year DIG 76th Division LLC bought the property for $525,000 and has sought to sell or develop the site ever since. Capacity Commercial’s current asking price for the property is $4,075,000.

The zoning issue noted by the PCC Board is no longer an uncertainty now that the property is CM2 zoned. That will allow mixed-use for retail, office space, and residential construction. Any development on the property would not require onsite parking due to its access to mass transit.

If the property sells for a reasonable price, this location would be an ideal low-income development. It is walking distance from PCC and on the number 2 TriMet bus line for fast downtown access. At a time when the City is looking to add more affordable housing, letting this unused parking lot remain undeveloped seems like a wasted opportunity.

Interested buyers should contact George Diamond or Nicholas Diamond at 503-326-9000.

Tabor Volvo Service on Glisan

Upgrades are underway at the Volvo service shop located at 6901 NE Glisan Street. Alamo Automotive has operated from this location for 20 years. With the former owner Mitch Wilson’s retirement, the new owner is busy putting his mark on the business.

Rebranded as Tabor Volvo Service, Brandon Cox has taken the reins of the repair shop where he honed his skills. Cox worked at this location for ten years before setting out for other opportunities in 2016. Cox remained in contact with Wilson over the years and had an open offer to take over the business when the time came. This year Wilson announced his retirement, taking Cox up on his offer to buy the business. “I’ve always loved cars, and my dream was to own a shop someday. So as they say, I’m now livin’ the dream,” remarked Cox.

Brandon Cox has a great deal of admiration for Mitch Wilson’s legacy but admits there are areas he can improve the shop. “Mitch was kind of a Volvo God in this area. Gave great deals to customers, but also was cleanliness challenged,” explained Cox. Over the years, many older Volvos have sat on the property in various states of disrepair. Cox is trying to remove one or two cars from the parking lot per week.

“Our plans are to get all the wrecked cars out of the lot and replace the old worn out chain fence with a nicer looking rod iron style. Clean up the lot and do some minor landscaping. Enough to make an inviting look to the place.” Explained Cox.

Longtime employee, Dennis Dillon, has remained on staff through the transition. Dillon is the uncle of Brandon Cox’s childhood friend and helped introduce Cox to the world of Volvo repair. Cox grew up close-by, attending Rose city park elementary, Roseway heights middle school, Grant high school, and PCC. 

Similar Texaco on NE Ainsworth & Union, 1937. Image courtesy of City of Portland Archives

Beyond being a recognizable landmark on NE Glisan, Tabor Volvo Service is home to a piece of automotive history. Opening in 1925 as a Texaco Gas station, the property features a unique Pueblo Revival service station with an arched entrance canopy. Around 1958, it became a Union Oil gas station. There are very few of these Pueblo-style gas stations left. Originally a Pueblo-style lubrication and tire station was in the back right corner of the lot. As with the reaming building, it was a flat-roofed stucco structure with projecting beams.

Tabor Volvo Service is open Monday through Thursday, 8:30-5:30, and Friday 8:30-2:00. They have recently expanded their service offerings to include all vintages of Volvo cars, including new models. Reach them at 503-408-1079 or their website to schedule an appointment. Watch for the site to continue to improve and bring by your Volvo when it needs servicing.

Art Deco Restoration

Construction is underway at the small Art Deco building located at 7631 NE Glisan Street. Restoration plans for this building started back at the beginning of 2020, but past permit issues caused work delays.

Constructed in 1940 as a dentist’s office, it’s the loan example of Art Deco architecture in the area. “The original owner was Herbert E. Craner, a Portland dentist, who practiced in this building for many years. When he died in 1957, his son Eugene took over the business.” Recounted Patricia Sanders, a local Montavilla historian.

Patrick Donaldson, the building’s owner, discover its dental history and found records of what Eugene Craner later did with the property. “His son, [Eugene], is the one that filled out the building application in 1983 to turn it into Montavilla Quality Pizza – a take-out pizza joint,” said Donaldson.

It turned out that the 1983 permit was the most recent one filed with the city before Donaldson started work. “That, in fact, was the last permit legally pulled on the space, despite the number of businesses that have occupied the building. I am still wrangling with the city to get a permit approved based on this old use.” Explained Donaldson, speaking a few months back.

Donaldson bought the building to become the new home of his architecture firm Harka Architecture. To accommodate his business, much of the interior and the entire roof will need rebuilding. The exterior walls are now extended up by a few feet, allowing space to install wood I-beams that will support a new roof.

A recent permit for the project will add an accessible ramp to the building and change occupancy classification from F1 to B. With the addition of the ramp and the new higher walls, the building’s appearance will vary slightly from its original form. However, much of its character seems to be intact.

This project differs from other similar updates on the street. It’s a restoration of a distinct architectural style performed by an architect for an architectural firm’s office. Acting as both a showpiece of architectural style and a classic building’s rehabilitation, much of its final look will be a statement about the new occupants and their respect for history.


Cover Image by Weston Ruter