Category: Infrastructure

SE 78th Closed for Watermain Work

Today the Portland Water Bureau (PWB) closed one block of SE 78th Avenue between SE Alder and Morrison Streets. Crews installed a new watermain to provide expanded service to the area. A four townhome development is underway on this street and should benefit from this water system upgrade.

The project, listed as ID W02815, only covers one block. PWB staff should complete work within a few days and will have the road open to through traffic soon. Patching the pavement may happen at a later date. Users of this street should use caution in the vicinity of the trench until the crews fully restore the road surface.

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I-84 East Exit 7 Closure

Starting May 8th, the Oregon Department of Transportation will close the Interstate 84 East Halsey/99th Ave off-ramp. This temporary closure allows TriMet construction crews the needed workspace to install support piers for a new MAX bridge over the freeway. Project managers expect to reopen Exit 7 to eastbound I-84 drivers on June 24th, 2022.

Work performed over the next two months will create the support structure for a new MAX Red Line bridge over I-84, located just east of Interstate 205. The bridge will provide pedestrian and bike access to the Gateway Green park and add a second track to the single-track rail system in the area. This project is part of the TriMet Better Red initiative to extend the MAX Red Line westward to serve ten more stations. Additionally, crews will install bidirectional rails in places with share tracks, speeding up the whole system.

TriMet suggests a detour onto Exit 6 towards I-205 South during the off-ramp closure and then use the Glisan Street/Stark Street exit. Drivers will follow NE Glisan east to NE 99th Avenue. Plan accordingly for this closure by using the ODOT TripCheck.com website for route information and updates. Better Red crews will continue their work in the area until its completion in 2024.

82nd Ave Now 100 Percent Portland

Yesterday, Portland City Council voted unanimously to adopt 82nd Avenue into the City’s network of streets. This jurisdictional transfer moves seven miles of State Highway 213, from NE Killingsworth Street to SE Clatsop Street, into the Portland Bureau of Transportation’s (PBOT) control. Additionally, the ordinance accepts $80 million in American Rescue Plan Act funding for necessary improvements on 82nd Avenue.

Yesterday’s vote completes years of community initiatives and governmental negotiations regarding the future of this neglected highway. Years of differed maintenance and insufficient investment by the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) left the roadway in poor condition, even as the north to south connector became the busiest street in the City.

TriMet’s number 72 bus line on 82nd Avenue boasts the highest ridership of any route in the public transit system. More than 20,000 vehicle trips occur per day on the road. Due to the deteriorating conditions and traffic volume, 82nd Avenue experiences some of the highest crash rates in Portland. Over the next few years, PBOT intends to use the initial funding to improve safety for pedestrians and drivers alike.

Already identified projects for 82nd Avenue will begin soon, now that this legislative milestone has passed. PBOT will deliver new lighting, safer pedestrian crossings, pavement repair, and sidewalk accessibility upgrades. In some cases, large sections of the road surface will need reconstruction. Most of the curbside lanes of the highway lack a concrete base layer. The original construction of OR213 supported just one travel lane in each direction with a shared center turning lane. Engineers designed the outer edges of the road for parking, not the heavy demands of traffic. 

Projects funded by yesterday’s approved ordinance only represent the beginning of upgrades expected in the area. Around 2026, ODOT will deliver a second payment to Portland, totaling $70 million. Along with the City’s pledged $35 million, this second $105 million wave of investment will enact more safety and livability improvement along 82nd Avenue. Community and business engagement around those future projects will ramp up over the next few years.

The City of Portland created a website for residents and business owners to track the new Building a Better 82nd initiative. Look for opportunities to contribute to the planning of 82nd Avenue through online and in-person community forums, focus groups, and surveys. PBOT will also partner with existing community organizations to guide future projects and coordinate with the people affected by the coming changes to the streetscape.

East Burnside Lane Closure

Update: All lanes on E Burnside are open again after crews complete work for the day. Barricades block the gravel-filled hole made earlier.


Today, the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) closed the eastbound lane of E Burnside Street from SE 81st to 82nd Avenues. Road signs are directing blocked traffic onto SE 81st Avenue around the construction. The TriMet number 20 bus line is not affected by this closure and is permitted past the detour.

An excavator is currently removing broken pavement and digging a trench along the south curb. Crews have blocked the north driveways for the Chevron gas station and Hong Phat Food Center. However, both businesses have alternate vehicle access along other streets. Drivers should plan to avoid this area while work is underway. Additionally, bikes and pedestrians may need to find safe routes around the worksite.

This article will be updated with information from PBOT staff regarding the purpose and duration of this roadwork project.

Detour onto SE 81st Avenue for eastbound Burnside traffic near 82nd Avenue

Berrydale Park Open House April 13th

Update: Images from the presentation are available below and the survey link is now online.


Original article published April 8th, 2022.

Next Wednesday, Portland Parks & Recreations (PP&R) will host the second open house for the Berrydale Park Improvement Project. The $3.75 million projects will significantly enhance park amenities and ensure the space remains relevant to Portlanders of all ages. The proposed upgrades will create a new skatepark facility, new pathways, new lighting, street improvements, and a new playground.

The project’s budget doubled over the last year, with Parks Commissioner Carmen Rubio increasing allocated funds to $3.0 million from an original $1.5 million budget. The bureau will source that money from System Development Charges (SDC) and not the City’s general budget. Frontage improvement work is paid for through the PP&R Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Transition program. It will allocate $650K to address ADA access for the park. PP&R’s maintenance fund will cover new playground equipment costing $100k.

The additional funding ensures the construction of a new skateboarding area, plus items identified by the community as priorities during the July 2021 public engagement session. Now PP&R staff want to present design options for the new park amenities. The public can participate in two ways. Designers are hosting an in-person event at Berrydale Park near SE 92nd Avenue and Salmon Street on April 13 from 4 PM until 6 PM. People unable to join the open house can view visuals from the live event and complete a brief survey online. The survey will remain open through Sunday, April 24.

Residents who participate in next week’s community engagement will help PP&R shape the future of Berrydale Park. The updates planned will draw in new park users and wake up the somewhat sleepy public space on SE 92nd Avenue. The outdoor event on the 13th will occur regardless of the weather, and forecasts call for rain. Plan to dress accordingly or watch the Berrydale Park Improvement Project website for the online presentation and survey.

Image from Google Maps

PBOT Installs Permanent Slow Streets

Last summer, the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) announced that many Slow Streets Program sites would become permanent installations. This week, crews completed work on four of the five locations planned for Montavilla. Although some locations in this program replaced the temporary orange barrels with concrete planters, these four installations utilize an alternative design created to accommodate narrow streets.

PBOT completed work on SE Stephens street at 76th AvenueNE 71st at E Burnside, and both sides of SE 87th Avenue at Stephens Street. Each intersection features signage listing a 15-mile-per-hour speed limit and indicates that the road is shared between bicycles, pedestrians, and cars. In the center of the roadway, three Tuff Curb® Traffic Separator Curbs with an attached reflective lane delineator wand will limit a vehicle’s turning radius and force slower speeds. These bendable tubes push over if a car makes contact with them and rarely cause damage. PBOT believes the installation will initially limit the driver’s speed and calls attention to the street’s mixed uses designation.

Examples of permanent Slow Street concrete planter outside of Montavilla

Early examples of permanent Slow Street featured concrete planters with signage displaying the slower speeds on a pole in the center of the traffic diverter. Those installations ensured vehicles slowed down or risked damage to the car when navigating around them. However, when addressing streets in the Montavilla neighborhood, PBOT determined a different traffic calming option was required. “Some locations are either too narrow or have other operational challenges, like no parking lane, that required using an alternative design to the planters.” Said Hannah Schafer, PBOT’s Interim Director of Communications and Public Involvement. Schafer explained that many other neighborhoods have these space-constrained streets and will receive the same configuration seen in Montavilla.

SE 87th Avenue at SE Stephens street North

PBOT selected the five local streets in the Slow Streets program due to their prior designation as neighborhood greenways and one of several other criteria. Those added factors included roads lacking sidewalks or where people do not have access to parks and open spaces. The Slow Streets treatment could also help areas with higher traffic volumes or experience vehicle speeds that make it challenging to walk, bike, or roll. Since the early pandemic, these locations feature temporary traffic calming measures, and most sites have received praise from residents.

SE 87th Avenue at SE Stephens street South

As the Slow Streets program becomes permeant across the City, PBOT staff will need to evaluate the effectiveness of the alternative design. Similar installations throughout Portland show signs of vehicles driving over the delineators leaving tire marks on the reflective surface or breaking them off at the mounting point. However, the intent of this new infrastructure is not to immobilize a vehicle. It is simply to caution drivers to slow down when entering the roadway, and both Slow Streets designs may accomplish that goal. Keep an eye out for the new posted speed limit and use extra caution while driving through the Slow Streets.

NE 71st Avenue at E Burnside Street

SE 92nd Improvements at Lincoln Street

SE 92nd Avenue at SE Lincoln Street features an unusual and confusing intersection thanks to a southbound turnout lane. This poorly marked configuration creates ambiguous crossing points for cars, bikes, and pedestrians. This summer, the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) will implement several safety improvements and restructure this complicated “T” intersection.

Funded as part of the Fixing Our Streets Project, PBOT maintenance crews will add a marked crosswalk and a median refuge island on SE 92nd Avenue aligned with the southwest corner of SE Lincoln Street. Workers will repaint 250 feet of the bike lanes on both sides of SE 92nd Avenue to place riders against the curb. Eleven round cement lane separators will provide a protected buffer zone between the bike lane and automotive traffic near the intersection.

Image courtesy PBOT

As a result of the expanded bike lanes and pedestrian safety improvements, PBOT will create two new No Parking zones and extend one zone further south. This parking change will remove six curbside parking spaces. However, the lane reconfiguration will add back four new parking spaces. Newly painted buffer zones on the east side of SE 92nd Avenue will support two parking spaces located between the bike and northbound traffic lanes. The southbound turnout will provide space for two additional parking spaces on its eastern edge. When complete, PBOT expects the project to eliminate just two street parking spaces.

Pavement markings showing pending improvements and site of the new sidewalk on SE Lincoln

PBOT crews will add another new marked crosswalk to aid pedestrians crossing SE Lincoln Street when traveling on the west side of SE 92nd Avenue. This portion of the project will require a street corner reconstruction and the installation of 90 feet of new sidewalk. Much of SE Lincoln Street lacks consistent sidewalk infrastructure. Creating new Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) compliant ramps and a short sidewalk connector will facilitate a clear, protected path to the enhanced SE 92nd Avenue crossing point.

As a well-traveled route to Berrydale Park and nearby schools, this confusing intersection needs these safety updates. PBOT’s changes should provide clear paths for vehicles, bicycles, and pedestrians by using physical lane delineators in conjunction with road markings. Additionally, the median island will incentivize fast-moving motorists to slow down as the roadway narrows, giving them time to avoid potential collisions. Look for construction to begin in summer, and use caution while crews are working in the street.

Image courtesy PBOT

Better Red work is Reshaping Upper Gateway Green

Update – Starting this week, pedestrians and bicyclists have a new detour when traveling on the I205 Multi-use Path. Construction crews erected a chainlink fence and laid new asphalt, creating a short loop around the active construction zone. Development plans for the path include a slight pavement diversion around support structures holding up the new overhead TriMet Red Line track. This temporary “C” shaped I205 Multi-use Path turnout should remain in place while the Redline Bridge construction is underway. Use caution in the Gateway Green area as this pathway shares space with construction vehicles and workers.


Original article published February 22nd, 2022

In September 2021, TriMet contractors closed the south end of the Gateway Green bike park as part of a light-rail expansion project. The work connects a second track leading from the airport to the Gateway Transit Center for MAX Red Line service. This project will also add a new entry point for the park with several updated amenities. The closure will continue through construction, ending in late 2024.

Rendering curtesy of TriMet and subject to change

Dubbed A Better Red, the project extends the MAX Red Line west to serve ten more stations and adds an extra track to single-track portions of the rail network, allowing for simultaneous bidirectional travel. The rail line expansion at the Portland International Airport can occur directly adjacent to the existing track. However, the land near the Gateway Transit Center is more constrained.

Due to the current track’s proximity to I205, TriMet needed a new path for the second track. The solution chosen by planners sends southbound light-rail cars over the northbound tracks and through the Gateway Green Park. Consequentially, TriMet needs to construct two overpasses. One will take the Red Line above the northbound tracks and the I205 Multi-use bike and pedestrian path. Then another overpass bridge will cross I84, leading into the Transit Center.

Rendering curtesy of TriMet and subject to change

The current I205 Multi-use trail will need to reroute slightly between bridge supports as it travels underneath the new Red Line tracks. That bridge work is underway with an expected path closure during overhead bridge installation work.

Rendering curtesy of TriMet and subject to change

Although the work inside the park is extensive, only two trails and the south entrance to the park are off-limits to visitors. Currently, construction material and equipment block the upper sections of Linda’s Line trail and Rebar Ridge trail. However, crews will extend both courses into a new high-point trailhead when the project completes. Parkgoers will access that amenity from a paved south entry plaza. Thanks to a pathway created alongside the Red Line’s I84 crossing, the south entry to Gateway Green will become the predominant entry point to the park.

When complete, Gateway Green will be more accessible to all types of users while enhancing the MAX service to the airport. The majority of the park will remain open during construction. Visitors should anticipate seeing construction-related activities around the property with the occasional detour along the I205 Multi-use Path.

New Signal and Crossing at SE 80th and Division

Update – Crews recently installed the traffic signal mast-arm poles on the southern corners of SE 80th Avenue and SE Division Street. Soon workers will return to install the remaining two poles. Then city staff will place the new control box, signals, and LED street lights planned for this intersection. Within the next few months, this busy crossing will become available to pedestrians and cyclists who have struggled to use this space safely.


Update March 11th 2022 – Crews recently completed the south side curb ramps and sidewalk reconstruction at SE 80th and Division. Work has moved across the street to the north side of SE Division Street, spanning Portland Community College’s vehicle entrance. After concrete work completes, signal and painting specialists will add traffic control lights and new crosswalks to the intersection.

Southwest corner SE 80th and Division
Southeast corner SE 80th and Division

Original Article Published January 21st, 2022

Starting January 31st, crews with Raimore Construction will begin road work at the intersection of SE 80th Avenue and SE Division Street. This project adds traffic signals, marked crosswalks, and other safety measures for bikes and pedestrians. Work will continue through March, causing limited traffic delays in early February. This enhancement is part of the continuing Outer Division Safety Project between SE 80th to 174th avenues.

Portland Community College’s (PCC) southeast campus interrupts SE 80th Avenue at SE Division. The school’s parking lot entrance roughly aligns with the 80th along the college’s Division Street frontage. Currently, the intersection lacks signals, marked crosswalks, and ADA-compliant curb ramps.

PBOT bid document for SE 80th Ave and SE Division St with phase notes

Updates to this intersection will reconstruct all four street corners and provide gaps in the previously uninterrupted traffic flow. Crews will install new curb ramps, add high visibility crass-walk paint, and apply green-striped bike crossings where the SE Division bike lanes intersect 80th Avenue. This new crossing point creates additional connection opportunities to the 70s Neighborhood Greenway project scheduled to run through this area. Four signal poles will support eleven new traffic signals, providing aid to cyclists and pedestrians traversing the busy street. 

Around January 31st, crews will excavate a trench across SE 80th Avenue on the south side of SE Division Street. Cars turning onto SE 80th from Division Street or connecting with SE Division Street from 80th may experience lane closures. Between February 7th and 9th, trench work across SE Division at SE 80th will close down sections of SE Division street. However, traffic will be permitted in both directions during this work, with occasional lane diversions. Crews expect to close portions of PCC’s south parking lot entrance for a few days between February 10th and the 25th.

Pavement markings showing placement of new ADA curb ramps on southwest corner

Road flaggers will direct traffic during work hours, and plans strive for minimal impact on automotive traffic at the intersection. Work is scheduled between 7 AM and 3 PM, avoiding impact to the evening commute. In March, crews will install signal poles at the corners and complete other remaining work. This later construction should not affect vehicle traffic. However, pedestrians and bicycles may have minor detours.

Portland Bureau of Transportation engineers designed these infrastructure improvements to safely move all modes of travel through an increasingly active intersection. Commuters along SE Division have grown accustomed to this type of construction activity as the multi-year-long improvement project nears completion. When driving through this area, use caution and plan for additional travel time during work hours.

View from PCC parking lot south entrance looking across SE Division down SE 80th Ave

SE 90th Improvements at Morrison

During the 2022 roadwork season, the Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) intends to reconstruct four corners at an intersection and repave a one-block segment of SE 90th Avenue. Crews will remove the existing curb ramps and sidewalk corners at SE Morrison Street and 90th, replacing them with new ADA compliant infrastructure. This updated path improves conditions for residents traveling to Berrydale Park and students commuting to the adjacent school.

Portland Maps image showing repaving segment on SE 90th

Decades ago, road crews constructed SE 90th Avenue from Morrison Street to Taylor Street with gravel gutters in the parking lane at the road’s edge. Although the street has sidewalks, curbs, and paved travel lanes, it lacks the supportive road surface expected in modern streets. PBOT will address one block of this deteriorated infrastructure from SE Morrison Street to SE Yamhill Street this year, with the remaining roadway repair waiting for a future budget allocation.

Existing SE Morrison Street and 90th with older curb ramps

Intersection reconstruction on these blocks takes a slightly different form from most Portland streets. This area of the City features six to eight-foot-wide planting zones between the sidewalk and curb. Most city streets only support four-foot green zones. Consequentially, these corners feature planting cutouts and long ramp approaches. At other nearby intersections with similar dimensions, PBOT removed the added planting zone and created sweeping corners at near double the size seen in other locations.

SE 88th Avenue and Morrison Street post corner reconstruction

Expect work on SE 90th Avenue between Morrison and Yamhill Streets sometime this summer or early fall. Detours for both cars and pedestrians will occur during construction. When the work is complete, all community members should experience improved access through this section of the neighborhood.

Existing SE Morrison Street and 90th without curb ramps