Tag: NE Glisan

Affordable Housing Survey

This week Metro published a survey seeking input on the affordable housing planned for NE 74th Ave and NE Glisan Street. The development will create up to 150 new apartments for people with 30-60% area median income. The survey is part of early engagement focused on supporting future tenant’s wellbeing and neighborhood benefit.

This project’s design phase is months away and scheduled for after developer selection occurs. For the purposes of this survey, participants need to imagine the development in its general form. The development is a multilevel apartment complex containing 120 to 150 units and on-site parking. Residences offer a mix of floor-plans supporting one or two adults and some larger households.

The questions in this survey do not relate to any design aspects of the site. Instead, it focuses on four primary areas of early project planning. Each section of the survey looks at draft value statements related to outdoor spaces, ground floor uses, services and programming, and future engagement to be done by the developer. Metro staff will work with the stakeholder group to create a clear vision statement based on this survey’s results. The developer awarded the project will have responded to the final value statement as part of their larger proposal.

Metro is looking to hear from specific groups in the survey process. Primarily they would like responses from people with similar experiences to those who will live in this new building, including people who have been houseless or lived in low-income housing. Black, Indigenous, and other people of color from around Portland are encouraged to participate in the process. Additionally, neighbors who live, work, or own a business near the site can submit responses.

This building will supply a substantial number of homes to low-income residents. However, Metro would like it to become an asset to the neighborhood. If you are the type of participant Metro is seeking for this survey, they ask that you complete the online form by March 1st, 2021. Metro’s affordable housing website will publish results a few weeks after the survey closes.

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/M9FS3ZW

Glisan Street Church Fenced In

UPDATE – Metal picket fence material now sits behind the church awaiting insulation. Unlike other styles used on the property, this project will not use a chain-link fence. That design choice will likely improve the outward appearance of the barrier. The pending winter storm may delay further work until next week.


Original article posted February 10th, 2021.

Yesterday, crews began installing a new fence and several gates around the Portland City Blessing Church on NE Glisan. The expanded fence line will wrap around the full front entrance and close-off the parking lot. Much of the new barrier runs along the property line on NE 78th Ave.

Located at 450 NE 78th Ave, the church occupies a corner lot with parking access on NE Glisan Street and NE 78th Ave. The new fence joins an existing gate and six-foot-tall galvanized chain-link fence installed along NE Glisan. Based on post mounting holes, a swing-door gate in front of the ADA will be the primary entrance. A potential of two roll-door gates could provide occasional access to the main steps and parking lot entrance.

Barriers along sidewalks are controversial. Fences protect the property from the passive intruder and discourage the uninvited. However, it can be unfriendly to others using the street. It signals some hostility to the public realm on a building’s frontage and makes the sidewalk more challenging to navigate. Hopefully, the new fence will employ an attractive design and complement the building without detracting from the communal spaces.

Glisan Crossing Light Repaired at 78th

This week, Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) crews replaced the pedestrian crossing signal on NE Glisan Street at 78th Ave. The light sustained damage the previous week due to a vehicle collision at the intersection. No serious injuries were reported.

The incident occurred at 11:43 pm on January 22nd, 2021. Based on skid marks and the direction of bent mounting bolts, the vehicle was traveling east. Tire marks on top of the pedestrian safety island indicate the automobile drove in the center lane before colliding with the signal pole. An oil spill located in the intersection shows where the damaged vehicle came to a stop after the accident.

A traffic cone protects wiring exposed by the removed single pole

This intersection is dangerous for pedestrians trying to cross NE Glisan. Both PBPOT and the Portland Police Bureau have coordinated on crosswalk enforcement actions at this intersection before. However, collisions continue to be an issue on this section of NE Glisan Street. Fortunately, the signal is replaced and functional again. Although not perfect, the flashing lights give pedestrians crossing Glisan some added protection.

Oil absorbent power coating site of vehicle collision

Isamini Bar on NE Glisan

A new bar is coming to NE Glisan Street later this year. Located at 7901 NE Glisan Street Unit 4Isamini Bar is the creation of Sam Nguyen. This is one of the first businesses to appear in the recently renovated 1890 era building.

The first information regarding the bar surfaced in a Liquor Licence application last week. When reached for comment, Sam Nguyen explained that Isamini Bar has a tentative opening date in early summer. However, COVID-19 makes exact timelines challenging to predict.

Located in the building’s single-story section, the bar will be a cozy 667 square-feet. The real estate flyer for the building provides a rough outline of the space. Although still in development, Nguyen offered a broad description of the coming menu “We’re offering a small selection of draft beers, bottled beers, wine, American/Asian appetizers, and food.”

Nguyen is new to bar ownership and should bring a unique perspective to the establishment. Transitioning from the medical field, starting Isamini Bar provides a need change for Nguyen. As COVIS-19 restrictions lift, people will likely rush back to public gathering spaces. This newest destination on Glisan should offer a comfortable space for people to interact with friends and restore their social lives.

Metro Seeks Input on TBN Development

Two years from now, Montavilla will gain 120 to 150 new households on NE Glisan Street. In a partnership between Metro and the Portland Housing Bureau (PHB), the former Trinity Broadcasting Network (TBN) site will transform into affordable housing. With the project in an early planning phase, opportunities for community input will become available next month.

A development of this scale requires years of negotiation and planning before construction can begin. Senior Communications Specialist with Metro, Constantino Khalaf, estimates it will take at least 24 months before Metro demolishes the current structure at 432 NE 74th Ave. “It will take some time for Metro and PHB to identify the right developer and nail down the details of the project, and the actual demolition and redevelopment won’t take place for another couple of years.”

Although construction is years away, community input occurs at this early phase of development. Khalaf indicated Metro would start their community engagement sometime next month. “There will be a survey going out in February to gather neighbor feedback on the values the community thinks we should embrace as we develop this housing.” Survey results will guild PHB and Metro in selecting a developer for this project that will incorporate the neighborhood’s guidance.

When completed, housing build on this property will prioritize “very” low-income tenants and substantially boost residential capacity in the area. Additional features of the development could add limited commercial space to the project, further strengthening NE Glisan’s growth as a retail and dining destination. Residents near this site are encouraged to participate in the survey and express their insights regarding this transformative development.


Residents wishing to receive the survey can sign up for project notifications at this link. https://forms.gle/63bfsp4WnQNVVny99  

EV Charging Coming to Glisan Fred Meyer

A recent permit application reveals that the Fred Meyer grocery store on NE Glisan Street plans to install electric vehicle (EV) charging stations. The proposed project would create four charging stations along the parking lot’s southern edge. Fred Meyer stores frequently offer Blink branded EV charges. 

Permit application 21-002507 seeks to install the four EV charging stations and supporting infrastructure at 6615 NE Glisan Street. In addition to the car chargers, concrete pads and bollards will protect the new equipment. Installation of a nearby utility vault will contain the substantial electricity connections needed to operate the chargers. The project area may also receive decorative screening to obscure the hardware from street view.

When completed, this Fred Meyer store will join three other public locations offering recharging service in the Montavilla area. Those locations are:

Drivers of electric vehicles will welcome the expanded availability of EV charging stations in the neighborhood. When visiting businesses on NE Glisan, they can soon charge their electric car and feel confident they have the energy to get back on the road. EV charging stations will be just one more feature to attract customers to NE Glisan and help grow businesses in the area.

AYCO Opens Center at TBN site

African Youth & Community Organization (AYCO) recently relocated to Montavilla on NE Glisan. Located at 432 NE 74th Ave, the group offers support services and youth mentoring for the African immigrant and refugee community. The expanded space obtained through this move allows their programs to grow, even while social distancing during COVID-19 restrictions.

Executive Director Jamal Dar founded AYCO in 2009 with an emphasis on athletics and mentoring. Over its first decade, the organization expanded its offerings to include health and education services. Added support for families continued the programs’ growth trajectory, supporting parents and people caring for special needs children.

AYCO seeks to strengthen a sense of cultural identity within the immigrant community while facilitating integration. Like the community they support, many of the team at AYCO immigrated from East Africa. Staff leverage that personal experience to guide newly arriving families adapting to this country. Their youth programs develop academic and team-building skills in a culturally familiar environment. Health services provide assistance navigating healthcare and disability resources, understanding the language and culture of those seeking support.

In 2015 AYCO opened its first location at 1390 SE 122nd Ave. That space allowed the organization to expand the services offered substantially. However, with increased community need, that location became too small. The building on NE Glisan offers the room need to grow the organization further. The new Center’s increased footprint will feature a gym to help the children embrace athletics beyond soccer and basketball. The new location also allows for a clinic to support children of all ages and abilities.

AYCO leased part of the single-story building from Metro, which acquired the site from Trinity Broadcasting Network (TBN). The previous owners used the building as a TV studio and broadcasting facility before selling the property in late 2019. Metro plans to develop the site two years from now and sought short term tenants. “The building where AYCO is leasing space will eventually be demolished, and the new housing that will be built in its place will prioritize families and households with very low incomes.” Said Constantino Khalaf, Senior Communications Specialist with Metro.

Metro happily made space in the building available for AYCO, reducing the rent to support the group’s efforts. “We’re excited that such a great, community-serving organization can use the space during these early stages rather than let it sit vacant.” Explained Khalaf.

Regardless of the short-term lease on the space, Dar looks forward to the site’s pending development. He intends to become a tenant within the new development’s commercial area when completed. NE Glisan Street is close to the community AYCO servers, and Dar feels it will be an ideal home for his organization.

When the pandemic’s risk has subsided, Dar hopes to interact with the Montavilla community more. Until then, his organization plans to continue to their outward community engagement through support for the hungry and unsheltered. Look for the location to become more lively with youth activities over the coming months, and visit the AYCO website if you want to know more about the organization.

Lower Speeds on NE Glisan

This week crews posted new speed limit signs along NE Glisan Street east of 82nd Ave. Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) reduced the speed on this heavily traveled roadway as part of Portland’s Vision Zero goal. A program established to eliminate traffic deaths and serious injuries. The change follows a year full of collisions in this area.

The recent speed limit adjustments made to NE Glisan from 82nd Ave to 122nd Ave creates continuity along the roadway. “With this change in place, NE Glisan Street now has a consistent 30 mph speed limit across most of Portland.” Explained Hannah Schafer, a Communications and Public Involvement representative with PBOT.

Although only reduced by five mph, a reduction from 35 mph to 30 mph can substantially decrease crash fatalities. According to Schafer, “speed is a factor in nearly half of deadly crashes that occur in Portland. Lower speeds result in fewer crashes. When crashes occur, lower speeds make it more likely that people will survive.”

The speed limit reduction joins other efforts by PBOT to improve safety on NE Glisan. Earlier this year, pedestrian crossing lights near Multnomah University joined other similar lights on this road. Reduced speed limits may help calm traffic. However, speeding on this road between I205 and 82nd Ave is a constant issue, regardless of the posted limit. With luck, this change and other PBOT initiatives will improve safety for all users of NE Glisan.

Glisan Chase Bank Closed

The Chase Bank, located at 6615 NE Glisan Street, has closed. Situated inside the Fred Meyer grocery store, this branch was one of the last banks providing teller services to the neighborhood. A US Bank branch also closed on Glisan street last October.

The permanence of the branch closure is not confirmed. However, this location disappeared from the Portland branch locater page on Chase’s website. The Chase logo over the bank entrance is now gone, and the space is empty of all furniture. Last week crews removed the built-in teller windows and countertop.

Currently, Fred Meyer appears to have inventory items stored inside the space on pallets. Both Fred Meyer and Chase declined to respond to inquiries regarding this location. A remodel may be planned, but indications point to Chase Bank removing this branch from the area. Being valuable space near the entrance, Fred Meyer will likely repurpose this room sometime in 2021.

Demolition at Multnomah University

Multnomah University will demolish one building on its campus to provide expanded athletics space. Part of the field expansion requires the removal of a few nearby trees. The University recently submitted demolition permit 20-217562 to begin work on the project at 8435 NE Glisan Street.

“This permit is to demolish the Campus Support Services Building and to cut down a few trees near it,” explained Gina Berquist, Vice President of Enrollment Management at Multnomah University. The building is on the east edge of the field near the parking lot. The removal of the maintenance building will create more field space near the gymnasium. “Our desire is to provide a little more space in the field for our athletes to practice and play in.” Said Berquist.

Like many education institutions, Multnomah University’s campus is closed to the public. However, classroom activities continue regular schedules, with safety modifications. Group practice for team athletics is not currently allowed at the University. Berquist acknowledged that the existing fields are not in use but that this work will improve post-pandemic activities. “At this point… there have been no practices due to this COVID season. [We’er,] looking forward to moving beyond COVID.”