Tag: 82nd Ave

Pawnshop Closes on 82nd Ave

The pawn shop located at 933 NE 82nd Avenue closed its doors and boarded up the windows this month. The family-owned business has operated the shop along 82nd Avenue since buying the property in 1996. Before that, it was the motorcycle destination of the area.

Developers constructed the single-story storefront in 1961 for a Matchless Motorcycle dealership. During the next four decades, the location represented the great expansion of American motorcycle culture in the area. Matchless’s parent company, Associated Motor Cycles (AMC), filed for bankruptcy in 1966, and sometime after that, the business changed to Portland Motorcycles. Often featured in Cycle World magazine, the November 1977 issue described Portland Motorcycles as having an impressive selection of parts.

Matchless Motor Cycles dealership ad 1961, featuring a signpost from Portland Oregon.

“Portland Motorcycles has a parts inventory that dates back to 1968-’69. They service Moto Guzzi as well as Ducati and Suzuki. Mr. Hillis, owner of the shop, says the parts department is in 90 percent good shape 95 percent of the time and that the company has the largest parts inventory on the West Coast.”

In the 1980s, the location became better known as Portland Kawasaki and continued operation into the 1990s. The future use of the property is uncertain. However, the 4,590 square foot corner lot is suitable for mixed-use redevelopment. Look for changes at the property later this year.

2040 Portland Freight Plan

Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) staff are in the midst of updating the City’s Freight Master Plan adopted by the Portland City Council in 2006. The 2040 Portland Freight Plan seeks to create a strategic road map for investing in urban freight infrastructure in Portland. This update allows the city to rebalance the commercial demands on the roads with the City’s Vision Zero and environmental goals. PBOT created a survey for Portlanders to help identify intersections, streets, curbs, bridges, ramps, and neighborhoods where people experience urban freight-related safety and mobility concerns.

Montavilla is a neighborhood surrounded and bisected by urban freight movement. The I84 and I205 freeways create its north and east borders, while 82nd Avenue, NE Glisan Street, SE Start/Washington Streets, and SE Division Street all carry substantial commercial traffic through the community. Businesses and residents in the neighborhood can provide unique perspectives to the survey, helping PBOT meet its goal of creating a safe, equitable, efficient, and sustainable urban freight system.

Participating in the PBOT survey is the public’s best opportunity to shape the next 20 years of freight activity in Portland. The results from the PBOT survey, along with extensive reports and analyses, will form the final Plan. Other guidance will come from the 2040Freight Community Advisory Committee (CAC) and Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) and multiple supporting documents developed throughout the planning process.


Title image courtesy of PBOT

Utility Pole Severed by Auto Collision

Yesterday, Pacific Power crews closed one lane of traffic as they replaced a damaged utility pole at 232 NE 82nd Avenue. A vehicle collided with the pole in the early morning hours of December 20th, snapping the wooden pole free at the sidewalk and cracking it in half.

Photo by Weston Ruter

Pacific Power received notice of the damage at 6:44 AM. The incident affected electrical service to a single customer, and crews restored service soon after 10:00 AM. An area resident noted on Facebook that a similar incident demolished the same utility pole in 2015. Tom Gauntt, Spokesman at Pacific Power, did not have records extending back to that prior incident but noted that 82nd Avenue utility poles often suffer similar vehicle collisions.

Within 12 hours of its reported damage, crews replaced the utility pole, restoring power to a single city streetlight on the west side of 82nd Avenue. The linemen minimized the disruption to commuters, only closing the outermost northbound lane of 82nd Avenue. Unfortunately, due to its location at the entrance to Wendy’s Restaurant and within inches of the curb, this price of infrastructure may suffer the same collision again. Fortunately, the wood utility pole is relatively easy to replace, and this junction point serves just one customer.


Title photo and other image as noted by Weston Ruter. All others, copyright Montavilla News.

Expanded Sidewalk by Yard at Montavilla

This week, crews installed the final segments of the fence surrounding the Yard at Montavilla. The food cart pod at 8220 NE Davis Street opened in July but maintained construction fencing around the property until this recent work began. The new barrier opens up two new pedestrian entry points along 82nd Avenue and eventually will accommodate wider paved sidewalks.

The black spear-top metal fence wraps the Yard at Montavilla on NE Davis Street and 82nd Avenue. The new boundary for the food cart pod provides a 15-foot setback from the curb on 82nd Avenue. Next year, the five-foot-wide sidewalk will expand to encompass the area now covered in gravel, creating a vastly larger walkway. “The Sidewalk will continue all the way up to our new fence. So it will be a very wide Pedestrian Zone sidewalk right there,” explained Kevin Dennis, co-owner of the Yard at Montavilla. 

According to Dennis, the 82nd Avenue sidewalk expansion work will start Spring of 2022. Crews will add a new ADA ramp at the corner and paint fresh crosswalk markings as part of the project. Along with other landscaping, the Yard at Montavilla’s owners planted three street trees near the new fence, evenly spaced along the NE 82nd Avenue property line. Together, the expanded walkway and trees create a model sidewalk under the new Civic Corridor guidelines.

In May 2019, the Portland City Council unanimously adopted the 82nd Avenue Plan, creating a Civic Corridor on 82nd Avenue. The document outlines expanded right-of-way dedication and frontage improvements, with sidewalks that range from 12 feet to 15 feet. Pedestrian District’s call for fifteen feet or wider walkways. They must also maintain a clear Pedestrian Through Zone of eight feet. This property is outside the Montavilla Pedestrian District, ending at E Burnside street. Properties on 82nd Avenue outside Pedestrian Districts only need to provide a 12-foot wide sidewalk and a Pedestrian Through Zone of six feet. The additional pavement added to this project beyond the requirements is supportive of the most pedestrian-friendly city designs. It should create a comfortable place for people to gather as they transition into the food cart pod without blocking pedestrians walking through the area.

As the weather warms, look for road crews working on the new larger sidewalk. Until then, the extra space is already accessible, and asphalt paths through the two new gates make it easier to drop in and grab a meal from a Yard at Montavilla cart.

Max’s Auto Spa on SE 82nd Ave

In August, Max’s Auto Spa opened at 145 SE 82nd Ave in the former Trendsetters Truck and Auto location. The husband and wife team named the company after their son, intending to build a multigenerational business. They started this venture further south on 82nd Avenue in a shared space. In less than two years, they have managed to grow the operation to the point it needed a larger dedicated location.

At just three years old, Max comes to work with his parents regularly. Sitting at his table, he works on puzzles and greeting guests. For both his parents, creating a family-friendly business is one of the core values of their company. As a mother, co-owner Denise Lazatin wanted to build an inviting business for women with respectful staff who do not pressure or talk down to customers. For her, a key component is creating a clean and safe waiting room where families can stay clear of the vigorous scrubbing happening in the nearby work bays.

In addition to the interior enhancements, the building’s exterior received some attention. The small structure next to Hong Phat now features a white band of paint wrapping the building, contrasting the dark grey body color. Cleaning up the 1950s era building took time for the staff at Max’s Auto Spa, but the work is essential for the type of service they provide. The business owners know from experience the need for good hygiene within the building and inside the cars. Before starting this business, co-owner Curtis Crandall worked for eight years in the medical industry. First as a surgical tech and then with the quality control group in a hospital’s infectious disease department. That experience cleaning medical facilities and hospital equipment prepared Crandall for the deep cleaning service his business now offers. Staff clean all vehicles with hand tools for the best reach. There are no spinning bush tunnels to drive through at this location. Instead, they invest in quality extractors to clean deep into fabrics where mold can grow inside a vehicle.

The building last winter before Trendsetters moved out.

Curtis Crandall is a former member of the US armed forces. That experience created a deep respect for the uniformed members of the community. He knows those professions consume a considerable amount of time, preventing some people from giving their vehicles a deep cleaning. Additionally, he knows public service professions aren’t the highest paying job in our society. For that reason, Max’s Auto Spa offers a 1% discount for each year of service. This discount extends to active or former US armed forces members, police officers, firefighters, and healthcare workers.

Max’s Auto Spa is scheduling appointments now, and customers can reach them at their website or by calling (503) 444-1100. They work Monday through Friday from 8 AM to 5:30 PM.

82nd Ave Culinary Event Kicks Off

Around the World in 82 dishes has returned after taking 2020 off. Starting tomorrow, the 82nd Avenue Business District will host a two-week-long celebration of dining diversity with an inclusive event featuring all food-related locations on and around 82nd Avenue. The event runs from October 23rd to November 7th, with an opportunity to win one of several $25 gift certificates by participating in the event’s social media contest.

To enter the contest, shop or eat at restaurants, food carts, and markets around 82nd Avenue during the contest dates. Then post about it on social media with the hashtag #82Dishes, including the location’s name and pictures from your visit. Event staff will select winners at random from Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and TikTok. People without social media access can participate by emailing a picture and location name to 82ndaveba@gmail.com.

The 82nd Avenue Business District extends from the Clackamas County line towards the Portland airport and features cooking styles from all over the planet. This annual event reminds Portlands of the culinary variety available to people along this street and encourages residents to explore the World in their own backyard. A list of eligible locations and other event information is available at the Around the World in 82 dishes website.


Disclosure: The author of this article servers on the 82nd Avenue Business Association board.

Sushi Yummy & Chinese Restaurant

A new Asian eatery has opened up in the former Imperial House Chinese Restaurant building. Located at 1815 SE 82nd AveSushi Yummy & Chinese Restaurant continues a 20-year-long tradition of Chinese cuisine under the iconic Ah Fong Kitchen sign. However, this time the menu includes Japanese dishes.

Hints that this location was changing first operated in a Liquor Licence application from May 2021. Over the last few weeks, workers have moved quickly to update the space and change the signs. The transition from Imperial House to Sushi Yummy & Chinese Restaurant was smooth, with minimal downtime during the transformation. Many things have changed at the restaurant, but others have stayed the same. The last three businesses at this location have maintained the same phone number, and the building’s exterior has remained mostly the same over the years.

The owners have bifurcated the menu into separate sections. Customers dining in will receive a two-sided color card showing the assortment of Nigiri and Rolls available, along with the expected sushi side dishes. Separately, another two-sided menu features Chinese restaurant standards. This combination is less common in Portland, but in Hawaii, diners celebrate the mixture of the two complimentary cooking styles.

Customers can dine-in, order online for pickup, or call 503-774-0061. They are open Wednesday through Monday, 11 AM to 10 PM.

PCC’s Draft Twenty Year Facilities Plan

This week, Portland Community College (PCC) released the latest draft of its district-wide Facilities Plan. The proposal covers all four PCC campuses, including the Montavilla location at the northwest corner of SE Division Street and 82nd Avenue. Details are available at the Facilities Planning Online Open House website until October 22nd.

The current Southeast Campus opened 20 years ago in a repurposed grocery store at 2305 SE 82nd Ave. Infrastructure investments over the years have expanded the campus to include new education-focused buildings. However, as the student population increases, there is a need to replace outdated facilities and construct new spaces. PCC leadership believes they can efficiently accommodate the next two decades of growth by developing a comprehensive expansion plan. The second phase of that work is concluding at the end of this year.

Over the last year, PCC representatives collected feedback from students, faculty, staff, and PCC neighbors about the physical environment at each campus. The researchers combined this qualitative input with data on student enrollment, regional demographics, and market trends to create development concepts that accommodate the next 10 to 20 years of college growth.

The Open House presentation outlines five primary developments recommended for the Southeast Campus. PCC intends to add a new wing to Mt.Scott Hall along SE 82nd Ave. The former single-story grocery store building, designated as Mt. Tabor Hall, will be replaced with a more efficient three-story structure featuring a greater connection to public spaces. PCC would build a new gym and childcare facility roughly located on the land currently housing the Community Hall Annex building. This new building will extend the active campus further west. The large parking lot spanning PCC’s portion of SE 77th Ave could become the location for affordable housing.

Additionally, planners are considering an expansion of the campus by acquiring the land currently owned by Bank of the West at 8135 SE Division Street. The bank’s 9,888 square foot property could become the primary entrance to campus, reinforcing PCC’s goal of using campus edges to connect with the community.

The space between buildings received as much attention within the proposal as the structures themselves. Planners prioritized peaceful outdoor areas in the campus core, providing an antidote to the commotion caused by the school’s location at an intersection of two busy streets. The proposal includes safe and interconnecting pathways that traverse flexible-use green spaces while connecting the neighborhood through the campus.

The facilities planning review process is nearing completion. A short survey accompanies the Facilities Planning Online Open House presentation. Neighbors should review draft concepts for each PCC campus and provide comments before the October 22nd deadline. Answers to these last questions will further refine the plan ahead of its completion. The finalized Facilities Plan will be publicly available in December.


Correction: A previous version of this article stated that Southeast Campus opened 40 years ago in its current location. The campus relocated to this space 20 years ago after existing at another site for 20 years before that move.

Park Picnic Shelter Demolished

Last week, demolition crews removed the picnic shelter and wading pool at Montavilla Park. Portland Parks & Recreation (PP&R) decommissioned both structures years ago due to health and safety concerns. This recent work clears the way for constructing a new open-air building of similar size. Construction crews expect to begin that project later this Fall

Funds for removal and reconstruction of the picnic shelter only recently became available, thanks to voters approving Measure 26-213 last November. City staff granted permits for this project in October of 2020, but pandemic-related restraints pushed back the project. Even with new levy funds secured earlier this year, PP&R could not schedule work immediately due to the substantial backlog of other work ahead of this one. However, now that work had begun, the site should transform quickly.

The deconstructed picnic shelter’s “H” configuration will be replaced by an 86-foot by 28-foot reticular covering. The new structure will feature a metal roof and have exposed wood rafters. Open gable ends, and a 23-foot high cathedral ceiling will provide ample natural light into the shelter. A stark contrast to the dark low-slung building now demolished. When completed, the area around the new structure will contain more green space and less pavement.

Plan detail courtesy City of Portland

Expect to see construction crews onsite in the following months building the replacement picnic shelter. If PP&R can keep to their schedule, users of the park will have covered space available during the cold and damp winter season.


Photos in this article by Weston Ruter

Road Safety Enhanced on 82nd and Beyond

Earlier this year, the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) approved $3.35 million worth of safety projects along 82nd Ave. While ODOT crews worked on some of those improvements near SE Hawthorne Blvd., Portland’s Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) staff were busy installing new stop signs six blocks away. Both projects are a response to years of automobile collisions and unsafe pedestrian crossings in the area.

Work is complete at the pedestrian island on SE 82nd Ave at SE Hawthorne Blvd. Previously, the half-island created a raised curb in the center lane blocking southbound traffic from colliding with a crossing person paused in the middle lane. ODOT crews have now added a similarly raised concrete pad to protect the pedestrian from northbound vehicles. The expanded center island also blocks left turns by drivers traveling east on SE Hawthorne Blvd. Before traffic engineers updated this intersection, a left-turning car could strike someone on the center island or crossing the northbound lanes of 82nd Ave. A new Right Turn Only sign is posted on the intersection’s southwest corner, alerting drivers to the recently installed obstruction.

New “Right Turn Only” sign at SE Hawthorne Blvd heading east

ODOT crews closed several nearby crosswalks to divert pedestrians crossing 82nd Ave towards the new safer crossing point. A few feet away from the enhanced crosswalk, staff installed an electronic speed sign. ODOT is installing these yellow “your Speed” displays at several spots along 82nd Ave. They are SpeedCheck® brand signs made by Carmanah Technologies. Using radar, they indicate the current speed of the closest vehicle and present a “Slow Down” message for people traveling over the posted speed limit.

SpeedCheck® sign showing true speed to southbound drivers on SE 82nd Ave

Nearby ODOT’s project, PBOT addressed two neighborhood streets that have needed updates for years. Crews installed four new stop signs at the intersections of SE Salmon and SE Taylor Streets along 78th Ave. Previously both intersections were uncontrolled and had no stop signs in any direction. Now divers must stop when heading north-south on SE 78th Ave at SE Salmon Street. Additionally, cars driving east-west on SE Taylor Street will now need to stop at SE 78th Ave.

New eastbound stop sign at SE 78th Ave and SE Taylor Street

One resident explained that they have tried for over 20 years to have these stops signs installed by PBOT. During just the last twelve months, he counted seven accidents occurring in front of his home. One incident destroyed his 100-year-old Walnut Tree. He and his neighbors continuously pushed the issue with Portland City officials. For three months, the group called the City to report their concern. They had almost lost hope. However, their persistence paid off, and they now have the stop signs they have wanted for years.

New northbound stop sign at SE Salmon Street and SE 78th Ave

Collisions and traffic fatalities have significantly increased over the last two years, but Portland has many areas that have seen decades of hazardous conditions. Although slower than many residents would like, transportation officials are now working to address those high-risk areas and make a safer neighborhood for everyone.

New southbound stop sign at SE Salmon Street and SE 78th Ave