Month: December 2020

Bus Shelter at 82nd and Burnside Replaced

TriMet installed a new bus shelter on E Burnside Street near 82nd Ave. It replaces one destroyed by a car crash in late June of this year. The new structure is no longer on the corner, moving a few feet away from 82nd Ave and closer to the bus stop. 

Vehicle collisions with these shelters along 82nd Ave are becoming common. The relocation of the bus shelter could prevent similar accidents from causing injury to waiting riders. This bus stop serves the westbound 20 bus line at a heavily use connection point in TriMet’s network. Users of this stop will appreciate the restoration of weather protection after many months without it.

Damage to the original bus shelter June 25th, 2020.

Tinker Tavern Opens Tonight

After a successful weekend of soft-opening events, Tinker Tavern will officially launch tonight. Starting at 4 PM Monday, Montavilla’s newest bar begins daily operation. In compliance with regulations, only outdoor dining and take out will be offered.

Tinker Tavern will open at 4 PM every night. Closing time is flexible, between 9 PM and 11 PM, based on demand. As business increases, they will start opening at noon on weekends. Space is limited outside. The tavern has two picnic-style tables that can accommodate four people each. Covered street-side bar seating will fit three groups of up to four people. Customers can place takeout orders in-person, and staff will happily make you a drink while you wait.

Tinker Tavern took a year to come to completion. COVID-19 delays in construction and navigating operational restrictions tripled buildout timelines. Not wanting to waste time, owner Erik Mahan used the delay to perfect the tavern’s menu. Taking inspiration from his business partner’s Buffalo New York upbringing, Mahan developed the deli-pub classics into his own Portland creations. Not all items are available at opening, vegetarian and gluten-free options are in development, but some core dishes are well tested and ready to impress patrons.

Mahan looks forward to the day that he can welcome guests inside. When the most recent restrictions expire, Tinker Taverns will have an additional six to nine indoor tables. The centerpiece of the tavern is the large dark-stained bar. Unfortunately, the guest will not sit along its edge until the pandemic is under control. Until then, staff will serve customers under tiffany style lights at one of the many tables along the outside walls.

Montavilla residents are excited for this location to open. A new destination feels like a piece of normalcy that is missing from our lives this year. Swing by this week and wave hello, have a drink and a quick bite to eat. The staff of Tinker Tavern will appreciate the warm welcome to the neighborhood.

Tinker Tavern is located at 7980 SE Stark Street.

TriMet Testing New Bus Shelters on Division

This week, TriMet tested a prototype bus shelter for the Division Transit Project. This installation validated the real-world functionality ahead of construction. Permanent deployments along the 15-mile project route will begin in 2021. Engineered for space-constrained stops along SE Division Street, the new shelter’s versatile design can expand into larger spaces while maintaining a constant appearance.

The shelters, built by Landscape Forms, needed to adapt to the project’s unique requirements. “Early studies determined that TriMet’s current bus shelters would not work within the extremely constrained and diverse Division Street corridor,” explained Tia York, Public Information Officer at TriMet. “The project’s modular shelter design provides a more cost-efficient option for the diverse conditions of Division Street, and the functional demands and safety considerations corridor-wide.”

Located at NW Division and Eastman Parkway in Gresham, the prototype only stood a few days before crews dismantled it. The TriMet Facebook post announcing the prototype contained several reader comments with design change requests. However, the planning phase for bus stop design has concluded. “The shelter design was heavily vetted and guided by input received [from] the project’s Community Advisory Committee during a two-plus year period from 2017 to 2019”, York commented. Additional input by the Committee on Accessible Transportation, The Oregon Commission for the Blind, and other stakeholders shaped the chosen design.

These bus stops offer more than a new look. Future riders will appreciate modern integrated lighting, digital TransitTracker, and hardened glass panels providing weather protection around seating areas. New sheltered stops include waste receptacles, dramatically increasing trash can availability on SE Glisan Street.

This prototype shelter demonstrates the general appearance and function of what TriMet riders can expect from the Division Transit Project. Construction will start next year and run through Fall 2022. The completed transit project will create a faster and more enjoyable commute to the city center for Southeast Portland residents.


Article image courtesy of TriMet

New Home Joins Existing House

A proposed two-story home will join an existing single-story house on the property at 1316 NE 76th Ave. The 1923 era home will remain on the lot with the new structure. Future property line adjustments may occur to accommodate a sale.

Permit 20-219283 seeks to construct a new single-family house with an attached single-car garage. This property is adjacent to a recently completed infill home. Public Registry number 20-172721 confirmed the lot lines for Lot 14 and the south half of Lot 15. The northern half of Lot 15 contains the completed infill house at 1328 NE 76th Ave, while the southern half of Lot 15 is the proposed new building’s site.

In this neighborhood plan, each full lot is 50 feet wide. Construction on a half-width lot leaves little room for the house, often constraining a structure to 15-feet wide. Comfortable floor plans can exist in homes of that scale. However, the single-car garage will dominate the front of the house and push the interior activities to the property’s rear. The building will likely look similar to its northern neighbor, but there is an opportunity for a creative design of this skinny house to differentiate it from other split-lot homes.

Infill homes are a needed expansion for Portland’s constrained housing market. Another residence in this area will be a beneficial addition to the city and use undeveloped land without removing older buildings. Construction will likely begin in early 2021.

Tinker Tavern Opening Next Week

UPDATED – Tinker Tavern opened Monday

Tinker Tavern will open for takeout and outdoor dining next week after months of COVID-19 delays. The restaurant and tavern announced on Instagram their intent to have a limited opening in mid-December. A newly completed covered Parking Plaza sits on Stark Street outside the business’s front door.

Tinker Tavern’s website describes the general flavor of menu offerings. “A fantastic beer line up with local collaborations, local and imported wines… Well-crafted collection of Buffalo, NY inspired bar food.” The tavern’s Instagram provides more details, displaying pictures of future menu items. The image captions read as probable menu descriptions and receive enthusiastic responses from Instagram followers.

  • Tangy marinara, gooey mozzarella, and crispy curly pepperonis on a crunchy French roll.
  • Housemade mild Italian sausage topped with spicy Weber’s mustard, Kewpie mayo, and a pile o’ peppers and onions on a mini Lavin roll.
  • Beef on Weck: A kümelweck roll piled high with juicy roast beef, horsey sauce, and just a *kiss* of au jus.
  • Housemade spicy Portuguese linguiça with chimichurri on a Lavin French roll.
  • Cured meat Italian sub: Stuffed to the gills with capicola, salami, prosciutto, provolone, and all the fixings on a sturdy Portland French Wedge roll.

The owner, Erik Mahan, committed to the new tavern just before COVID-19 shutdowns rolled out across the state. Not having staff to support, Mahan managed a slow buildout and could wait for the right time to open up. After many challenges and a near year-long startup process, it is finally time to open. Starting Monday, look for signs Tinker Tavern is open and try out Montavilla’s newest addition.

Tinker Tavern is located at 7980 SE Stark Street.

Tinker Tavern’s covered Parking Plaza

UPDATED – Added wording to specify Monday as the first open date.

Demolition at Multnomah University

Multnomah University will demolish one building on its campus to provide expanded athletics space. Part of the field expansion requires the removal of a few nearby trees. The University recently submitted demolition permit 20-217562 to begin work on the project at 8435 NE Glisan Street.

“This permit is to demolish the Campus Support Services Building and to cut down a few trees near it,” explained Gina Berquist, Vice President of Enrollment Management at Multnomah University. The building is on the east edge of the field near the parking lot. The removal of the maintenance building will create more field space near the gymnasium. “Our desire is to provide a little more space in the field for our athletes to practice and play in.” Said Berquist.

Like many education institutions, Multnomah University’s campus is closed to the public. However, classroom activities continue regular schedules, with safety modifications. Group practice for team athletics is not currently allowed at the University. Berquist acknowledged that the existing fields are not in use but that this work will improve post-pandemic activities. “At this point… there have been no practices due to this COVID season. [We’er,] looking forward to moving beyond COVID.”

82nd Rooftop Cell Equipment Upgrades

Rooftop communication equipment mounted atop 1441 SE 82nd Ave will receive minor upgrades. Application 20-219020 seeks to replace six antennas and six remote radio units with new equipment. Part of this project is the removal of two tower-mounted amplifiers. New Unistrut mounting rails will connect to an existing frame and support the new remote radio units.

Smartlink, a communications infrastructure services company, applied for the permit. As with most cellphone equipment upgrades, this work should enhance local service for residents in the area.


Article image courtesy of Google Maps

Hinterland Coffee Roasters and Apparel

Hinterland will open its second location at 7112 NE Glisan Street, expanding from the existing store in Sonoma County, California. Although currently closed to the public, the new storefront will eventually offer prepared coffee drinks along with retail items. Until then, this location serves as the hub for online sales and production.

The Montavilla store houses a roastery for coffee bean production and a printshop for clothing and other items. Finished products are shipped back to the California store to sell from that location. Hinterland’s two owners decided to expand north, splitting store management between them. Owner Trinia Jean runs the Montavilla shop and is in charge of coffee and apparel production. Jean moved to the region due to its lower cost of living and proximity to the bulk of Hinterland’s customers.

Hinterland began in 2014 as a screen-printing collaboration that exclusively uses American made clothes for their prints. Before the pandemic, they decided to expand into coffee production. Jean has 16 years of experience with coffee preparation and sales. Durning the COVID-19 shutdowns, coffee sales kept the business healthy, with Coffee Subscriptions becoming a significant portion of the companies monthly sales. The store in Portland provides expanded space for coffee production and online order fulfillment.

The shopfront’s patina attracted the business owner to Montavilla. “The storefront was rough, and I like to improver places,” explained Jean. The 1914 building had the right character for the company’s esthetic, and the store’s interior buildout embraces those features. An old display case left in the store is now merged with a salvaged bar to form a key fixture for coffee service. Jean explained that “there will not be many new things” decorating the store outside of inventory items. Instead, aged and reused items are preferred.

Hinterland’s operational footprint expands beyond the single shop. Jean rents 7112 and 7114 NE Glisan Street, using the back half of Citrine Bloom next door for coffee roasting and product creation. Cooperation between the two stores will expand when they open to walk-in customers. A passageway between the shops let customers transition between coffee, clothing, and plant shopping.

An opening date is dependent on health and safety recommendations from the State and County. Fortunately, the company is not solely reliant on in-person customers. Shopping the Hinterland website is an equally effective way to support this Montavilla based retail and manufacturing business. Eventually, the storefront will be alive with coffee service and shoppers, adding to the Glisan Street revival.

Union Rose Moving Locations on Stark

Union Rose is moving down the street to a new storefront at 8029 SE Stark Street. Currently, they are located a block east on the same side of Stark Street. The larger space will allow for more onsite manufacturing of women’s clothing and expanded gift-items available in the shop.

Owner Rita Hudson-Evalt was excited to find a new place nearby. “I love being in Montavilla,” remarked Hudson-Evalt when describing the short move. Staying in the neighborhood is essential for the business and staying on the street ensures minimal disruption for customers. Union Rose has been in its current location since before Hudson-Evalt bought the store in 2014. The original owner, Nicole Prevost, opened the store on Martin Luther King Jr Blvd in 2007 and moved to Montavilla not too long after that. Hudson-Evalt was a designer, selling to the store when Prevost was looking to leave the business. “I couldn’t handle the place not being around,” explained Hudson-Evalt when describing why she bought the shop.

Six years later, the store is continuing to survive in the pandemic thanks to a loyal customer base and the online store’s success. “We are going to make it through,” Hudson-Evalt said with a tone of relief. Doubling the store’s floor space affirms the businesses’ health and positions the company to be more flexible as the economy changes and recovers.

The rough outline of the future storefront

The store will shut down its old location on December 28th and reopen in the new storefront around January 6th. Hudson-Evalt will bring clothing production entirely onsite, moving from the basement studio where much of the work happens today. The back portion of the new shop becomes dedicated to product creation. A curtain behind the counter will hide overly messy projects, but most times it will remain open to show customers the process.

Union Rose’s location at 7909 SE Stark Street will become available in the new year. “It was a fantastic location,” according to Hudson-Evalt. Growing out of the space was the only issue for the company. Montavilla retail space is affordable with accommodating building management. “Both landlords have been great,” said Hudson-Evalt about the process of switching locations. For instance, the new owner of 8029 SE Stark Street upgraded the front windows to new energy-efficient glass, retaining the old appearance with improved comfort.

Sanborn Map 1924

The future home of Union Rose previously housed Tanuki and other restraints. The building’s history began in 1924. This particular space had an address of 2019 E Stark Street before the street renumbering of the 1930s. The first business listing at that address was for The Pastime pool hall. A 1926 advertisement in the Montavilla Times declares it “Where All Good Fellows Meet.”

Montavilla Times March 25th 1926

This move is an exciting shuffle of Stark Street businesses. Carmen Ripley, the owner of Beanstalk Children’s Resale Clothing, expressed excitement about Union Rose’s future move to the storefront next to her shop. The two apparel stores should complement each other’s business with minimal overlap in offerings. The new year will bring many changes to the neighborhood, and Union Rose’s move seems to be only positive for the community.

Crosswalk Signal Repair at 82nd

Repairs are underway replacing damaged crosswalk signaling equipment at the corner of 82nd Ave and NE Glisan Street. Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) workers are onsite replacing equipment damaged by a vehicle collision. The nearby TriMet sign still lays flat, bent to the ground at its base.

This intersection continues to be hazardous with several recent collisions. The nearby bus stop has a new shelter after previously being demolished by another vehicle collision. Fortunately, the new bus shelter survived this most recent incident. However, the number 19 bus stop sign will need a replacement for the second time this year.

UPDATE 3:15 PM – The work is complete and a new bus stop sign is installed

New bus stop sign is installed